Best paying jobs for Biological and Physical Sciences - Updated 2020

In addition to job openings resulting from employment growth, openings will arise from the need to replace managers who retire or move into other occupations. Competition for jobs in this occupation is expected to be strong because of its typically higher salaries, greater control over some types of projects, and better access to resources. Experiences can vary widely with the variety of industries and organizations these managers work in.
Job Title 2018 median Pay Education Number of Jobs Job Outlook What they do
Natural Sciences Managers $123,860 Bachelor's degree 56,700 Employment of natural sciences managers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Employment growth should be affected by many of the same factors that affect employment growth for the scientists whom these managers supervise. Natural sciences managers supervise the work of scientists, including chemists, physicists, and biologists. They direct activities related to research and development, and coordinate activities such as testing, quality control, and production.
Political Scientists $117,570 Master's degree 7,300 Employment of political scientists is projected to grow 3 percent from 2016 to 2026, slower than the average for all occupations. Political scientists should face strong competition for jobs as the number of candidates is expected to exceed the number of available positions. Political scientists study the origin, development, and operation of political systems. They research political ideas and analyze governments, policies, political trends, and related issues.
Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers $91,130 Bachelor's degree 32,000 Employment of geoscientists is projected to grow 14 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. The need for energy, environmental protection, and responsible land and resource management is projected to spur demand for geoscientists in the future. Geoscientists study the physical aspects of the Earth, such as its composition, structure, and processes, to learn about its past, present, and future.
Medical Scientists, Except Epidemiologists $84,810 Doctoral or professional degree 120,000 Employment of medical scientists is projected to grow 13 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Medical scientists will continue to be needed because they contribute to the development of treatments and medicines that improve human health. Medical scientists conduct research aimed at improving overall human health. They often use clinical trials and other investigative methods to reach their findings.
Psychologists, All Other $79,010 166,600 Employment of psychologists is projected to grow 14 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Job prospects should be best for those who have a doctoral degree in an applied specialty. Psychologists study cognitive, emotional, and social processes and behavior by observing, interpreting, and recording how individuals relate to one another and to their environments. They use their findings to help improve processes and behaviors.
Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health $71,130 Bachelor's degree 89,500 Employment of environmental scientists and specialists is projected to grow 11 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Heightened public interest in the hazards facing the environment, as well as increasing demands placed on the environment by population growth, are expected to spur demand for environmental scientists and specialists. Environmental scientists and specialists use their knowledge of the natural sciences to protect the environment and human health. They may clean up polluted areas, advise policymakers, or work with industry to reduce waste.
Accountants and Auditors $70,500 Bachelor's degree 1,397,700 Employment of accountants and auditors is projected to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. In general, employment growth of accountants and auditors is expected to be closely tied to the health of the overall economy. As the economy grows, more workers should be needed to prepare and examine financial records. Accountants and auditors prepare and examine financial records. They ensure that financial records are accurate and that taxes are paid properly and on time. Accountants and auditors assess financial operations and work to help ensure that organizations run efficiently.
Labor Relations Specialists $67,790 Bachelor's degree 81,100 Employment of labor relations specialists is projected to decline 8 percent from 2016 to 2026. Union membership has declined, resulting in less demand for the services of labor relations specialists. Labor relations specialists interpret and administer labor contracts regarding issues such as wages and salaries, healthcare, pensions, and union and management practices.
Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists $63,420 Bachelor's degree 19,400 Employment of zoologists and wildlife biologists is projected to grow 8 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. More zoologists and wildlife biologists will be needed to study human and wildlife interactions as the human population grows and development impacts wildlife and their natural habitats. However, because most funding comes from governmental agencies, demand for zoologists and wildlife biologists will be limited by budgetary constraints. Zoologists and wildlife biologists study animals and other wildlife and how they interact with their ecosystems. They study the physical characteristics of animals, animal behaviors, and the impacts humans have on wildlife and natural habitats.
Anthropologists and Archeologists $62,410 Master's degree 7,600 Employment of anthropologists and archeologists is projected to grow 4 percent from 2016 to 2026, slower than the average for all occupations. Prospective anthropologists and archeologists will likely face strong competition for jobs because of the small number of positions relative to applicants. Anthropologists and archeologists study the origin, development, and behavior of humans. They examine the cultures, languages, archeological remains, and physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators $62,270 Bachelor's degree 7,800 Employment of arbitrators, mediators, and conciliators is projected to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. This projected growth is driven by the fact that mediations and arbitrations are typically faster and less costly than litigation and may be required in certain types of legal cases. Arbitrators, mediators, and conciliators facilitate negotiation and dialogue between disputing parties to help resolve conflicts outside of the court system.
Historians $61,140 Master's degree 3,300 Employment of historians is projected to grow 6 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Competition for jobs may be very strong because there are few positions available relative to the number of people seeking jobs in the field. Historians research, analyze, interpret, and write about the past by studying historical documents and sources.
Dietitians and Nutritionists $60,370 Bachelor's degree 68,000 Employment of dietitians and nutritionists is projected to grow 15 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations. The role of food in preventing and treating diseases, such as diabetes, is now well known. More dietitians and nutritionists will be needed to provide care for patients with various medical conditions and to advise people who want to improve their overall health. Dietitians and nutritionists are experts in the use of food and nutrition to promote health and manage disease. They advise people on what to eat in order to lead a healthy lifestyle or achieve a specific health-related goal.
Curators $48,400 31,000 Overall employment of archivists, curators, museum technicians, and conservators is projected to grow 13 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. The need to store information in archives and public interest in science, art, and history, may continue to spur demand for archivists, curators, museum technicians, and conservators. Applicants should expect very strong competition for jobs. Archivists appraise, process, catalog, and preserve permanent records and historically valuable documents. Curators oversee collections of artwork and historic items, and may conduct public service activities for an institution. Museum technicians and conservators prepare and restore objects and documents in museum collections and exhibits.