Best paying jobs for Natural Resources Conservation - Updated 2020

The need to replace retiring workers should create opportunities for conservation scientists and foresters. Job prospects will likely be best for conservation scientists and foresters who have a strong understanding of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology, remote sensing, and other software tools.
Job Title 2018 median Pay Education Number of Jobs Job Outlook What they do
Environmental Scientists and Specialists, Including Health $71,130 Bachelor's degree 89,500 Employment of environmental scientists and specialists is projected to grow 11 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Heightened public interest in the hazards facing the environment, as well as increasing demands placed on the environment by population growth, are expected to spur demand for environmental scientists and specialists. Environmental scientists and specialists use their knowledge of the natural sciences to protect the environment and human health. They may clean up polluted areas, advise policymakers, or work with industry to reduce waste.
Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists $63,420 Bachelor's degree 19,400 Employment of zoologists and wildlife biologists is projected to grow 8 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. More zoologists and wildlife biologists will be needed to study human and wildlife interactions as the human population grows and development impacts wildlife and their natural habitats. However, because most funding comes from governmental agencies, demand for zoologists and wildlife biologists will be limited by budgetary constraints. Zoologists and wildlife biologists study animals and other wildlife and how they interact with their ecosystems. They study the physical characteristics of animals, animal behaviors, and the impacts humans have on wildlife and natural habitats.
Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers $63,380 807,000 Employment of police and detectives is projected to grow 7 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The continued need for public safety is expected to lead to new openings for officers, although demand may vary by location. Police officers protect lives and property. Detectives and criminal investigators, who are sometimes called agents or special agents, gather facts and collect evidence of possible crimes.
Foresters $61,340 Bachelor's degree 34,600 Employment of conservation scientists and foresters is projected to grow 6 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The continued need for wildfire prevention and suppression services, as well as consumer desire for wood pellets, will help drive demand for conservation scientists and foresters. Conservation scientists and foresters manage the overall land quality of forests, parks, rangelands, and other natural resources.
Forest Fire Inspectors and Prevention Specialists $60,200 14,100 Employment of fire inspectors is projected to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Jobseekers should expect strong competition for the limited number of available positions. Fire inspectors examine buildings in order to detect fire hazards and ensure that federal, state, and local fire codes are met. Fire investigators, another type of worker in this field, determine the origin and cause of fires and explosions. Forest fire inspectors and prevention specialists assess outdoor fire hazards in public and residential areas.
Firefighters $49,620 Postsecondary nondegree award 327,300 Employment of firefighters is projected to grow 7 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Physically fit applicants with paramedic training will have the best job prospects. Firefighters control and put out fires and respond to emergencies where life, property, or the environment is at risk.