Best Online Masters Programs in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law

Online Master's degree in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law is offered by 2 US universities. The tuition for the Master's degree can range from $39,672 per year at Seton Hall University to $39,672 at Seton Hall University.

Georgetown University logo
Ranked as:  #22 in Best National University
Tuition:  -
State:  Washington D. C.
Acceptance:  -

Graduate Degree and Certificate ProgramsToggle Graduate Degree and Certificate Programs.

Dual Degree Programs.

LL.M. in International Arbitration and Dispute Resolution from Tsinghua Law School in Beijing.

Our Securities and Financial Regulation LL.M. is offered as a part-time Executive (online) degree and is available to both domestic and foreign trained students with a first degree in law (J.D. or equivalent degree).

A rotating selection of seven or courses will be offered on a distance basis each year. Part-time students generally complete their degree requirements within one-and-a-half to three years (with possible extensions for up to two additional years).

Non-resident (online) students take the same examinations as resident students and are graded on the same curve.

Prior or concurrent completion of a basic course in Securities Regulation (does not count toward specialization credits but may count as elective credit).

Note that this program is part-time and, as such, is not available to students with F-1 or J-1 visa status.

Our Online Programs offer students the same high-quality instruction and learning experience as the traditional LL.M. and Certificate programs, but allow students the flexibility to attend class and complete assignments at times that are convenient to them. The tuition and program requirements are the same for both on-campus and online programs.

The majority of our online courses are asynchronous and lecture-capture-based, with video recordings of on-campus class lectures available for streaming online within 24 hours of the live class taking place. virtually at a specific date or time.

We also have a handful of courses that are synchronous and delivered via Zoom videoconferencing technology. These classes do require live virtual attendance each week, and the delivery method and class times will be noted in the course schedule.

As our online courses are equally as rigorous as our on-campus courses, students should expect to spend approximately two-three hours per credit hour per week on coursework in addition to two hours of class time. This translates to approximately six to eight hours per week for each 2-credit class.

Note State Authorization to offer Online Programs:.

Georgetown is also authorized separately to deliver online education to students residing in California.

Disclosure Regarding Professional Licensure Georgetown Law online programs, which include the Executive LLM in Taxation, Executive LLM in Securities Financial Regulation, MSL in Taxation, and Certificates in International Tax and State and Local Tax, will not lead to professional licensure and will not qualify a student to sit for any state bar exam.

Search LL.M Executive LL.M. In Securities Financial Regulation Courses.

This is a basic course for students with NO accounting background or experience. A student will learn what an asset and a liability are, what the basic financial statements are, how financial statements are developed from the underlying accounting information of a company, and how the basic transactions of a business affect each line item of each financial statement. Students will learn understand the basics as it relates to the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. Methods will include reading and text exercises, class lectures, and case exercises. Grading may be based on a final examination.

LAW 3026 v00 Beyond the IPO: Exempt Securities Offerings.

Students successfully completing this course will be positioned to analyze whether a particular transaction exemption under the Securities Act is available and, if so, maximize its protections. of the transaction exemptions as well as the circumstances and motivations under which the exemptions are sought and claimed. The major topics to be taught will include the Section 4(a)(2) private offering exemption and the Rule 506(b) safe harbor thereunder, Securities Act Rule 144, Regulation Crowdfunding, and Regulation A. The course will also cover topical developments such as recent efforts to use transaction exemptions for initial coin offerings (ICOs). In that most securities transactions take place pursuant to an exemption, this course will provide an opportunity for students to analyze and structure securities transactions and will heighten their understanding of an evolving area of securities law.

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Securities Regulation.

The course is designed to provide a practical survey of a complex white-collar (securities, commodities, and other financial frauds) investigation from inception through the Wells process, civil and criminal charging decisions, and trial. We will consider a variety of common practice issues including managing concurrent SEC and DOJ investigations structuring and conducting the internal investigation responding to SEC document subpoenas conducting witness interviews and, the application of various privileges. The course will cover substantive legal issues related to securities fraud, market manipulation, cryptocurrency regulation, and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), among others. Further, students will gain practical knowledge of the issues and opportunities arising through interaction and negotiation with the SEC and DOJ during the investigative process, and the strategic decisions of waiver and cooperation to achieve the optimal result for the client.

Recommended: Criminal Justice (or Democracy and Coercion) or Criminal Procedure or a course in White Collar Crime.

LAW 830 v00 Disclosure Under the Federal Securities Laws.

This course examines the disclosure requirements under the Securities Act of 19 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and related regulations. Disclosure requirements will be examined in the context of registered offerings as well as exempt offerings. The duty to disclose, the concept of materiality, the principles of integrated disclosure and the line item disclosure requirements of SEC regulations will be discussed. The regulatory treatment of forward looking disclosures, selective disclosure and disclosure of non-GAAP information also will be addressed. Topics will include special disclosure issues arising in connection with IPOs, periodic reporting and proxy solicitations. Regulatory developments and SEC practice and procedures will be covered, along with practice tips. Although the applicable regulatory framework will be reviewed, prior completion of a securities regulation course is recommended.

This class will focus on the tax aspects associated with nonqualified deferred compensation, including the tax doctrines of constructive receipt and economic benefits, as well as the three different income tax regimes set forth in section 409A, section 457A and section 457(f), and the employment tax regime under section 3121(v). In addition to exploring the various rules and the Federal tax consequences under these and other Code sections, including sections 162(m), 280G and 4960, consideration will be given to the tax policy issues driving the varying treatment and the design, drafting and implementation of many types of executive compensation arrangements, including equity compensation awards, traditional nonqualified deferred compensation plans, SERPS, excess benefit plans, rabbi trusts and top hat plans. This class will also provide an introduction to the registration and reporting requirements under the Securities Act of 19 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, respectively, regarding executive compensation arrangements.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and Taxation of Nonqualified Deferred Compensation.

Note: This course is required for the Employee Benefits Certificate.

LAW 2009 v01 Energy Trading and Market Regulation.

Energy markets are dynamic and growing rapidly, creating new business opportunities and legal challenges not only for traditional energy companies such as utilities, pipelines, natural gas producers and independent power producers, but also for newer market entrants including investment banks, demand response providers, smart grid and renewable energy companies, storage providers, hedge funds, and large industrial and commercial consumers of natural gas and electricity. The course will focus on the economic regulation of physical energy markets by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), primarily the regulation of transmission, price and competition in the electric and natural gas markets. such as carbon pricing in organized wholesale electricity markets, the shale gas revolution, the impact of subsidies for certain resources, pipeline and electric transmission infrastructure development and cost allocation, and integrating demand resources and renewables and (vi) the constant interplay among Congress, federal and state energy regulatory agencies and market participants. Students will gain an appreciation for the legal and market challenges confronted by market participants. Some sessions will feature guest lecturers. There will be no final examination.

LAW 2044 v00 Financial Market Reform and Innovation.

This course examines the ever-evolving regulation of financial markets, institutions, and innovative financial products. We will evaluate the emerging regulatory issues and reform of over-the-counter derivatives markets, analyzes changes to federal banking laws (including systemic risk regulations, new capital and margin requirements, resolution authorities and the Volcker Rule), and explores enhanced consumer protection rules. We will examine how virtual currencies are used by financial market participants and evaluate major developments in the regulation of virtual currencies, such as Bitcoin, Ether, Ripple, Litecoin, and others.

Learning objectives: By the end of this course, I hope you will have a comprehensive of the implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act. You will gain a sense of the genesis and policy developments underpinning the Dodd-Frank legislation, an of fundamental aspects of financial reform in Dodd-Frank, its basic requirements, its overarching goals, and its upsides and downsides. You will not learn every detail of financial services regulation or every part of Dodd-Frank, but you should grasp the nature and structure of the central tenants of federal oversight of the financial services industry and its market participants.

Another aim of the course is skills-oriented. By participating in class discussions and preparing and presenting the Comment Letter Group Project, I hope you will hone your skills in speaking fluently and comfortably legal issues. section of syllabus.

LAW 193 v04 Financial Regulation and Financial Crises.

In 2020, the coronavirus pandemic, which has caused even greater human suffering, triggered economic and financial consequences that almost led to another financial crisis. The reforms implemented after 2008, as well as the implementation of emergency programs used in 2008, were likely the reasons we did not have another financial crisis.

We will begin by briefly reviewing the historical development of the United States banking industry, and the regulatory structure governing it, to get an appreciation of the economic and political forces that have shaped the regulation of our financial system.

We will then focus on the 2008 financial crisis. We will examine the forces that produced the complex financial system of the early 21st century, including the rise of the shadow banking industry and the growth of derivatives. We will examine the response to the crisis, which included drawing on emergency powers that were first created by Congress in response to earlier financial crises, as well as new authorities created in response to the events of 2008. We will look at some of the difficult choices faced by government officials in responding to the crisis, as well as the role of individual accountability for behavior that contributed to the crisis. We will also examine the reforms implemented as a result of the crisis.

Finally, having started the course with a look at the beginnings of the American financial system, we will end with what many predict is the future: cryptocurrencies and central bank digital currencies, the development of which has been accelerated by both the 2008 crisis and the pandemic.

The course will include sessions with guest speakers who have been responsible for some of the critical policy decisions that we will discuss.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. courses, Federal Banking Regulation: Modern Financial Institutions and Change or Financial Services: Regulation in the Age of Disruption.

LAW 3034 v00 Global Derivatives Law and Regulatory Policy.

This course explores the global legal and regulatory framework for futures, swaps, options, and other derivatives, with a focus on the ways that technology and innovation are changing how these markets function and are regulated. that perform the role of traditional intermediaries. Students will analyze the unique challenges that the increasing use of these and similar technologies present for U.S. and international policymakers, regulators, and market participants. Students will learn the overall structure and key provisions of the US regulatory framework and policy perspectives, which will be compared and contrasted with those of other jurisdictions, such as the EU and its member countries, with an emphasis on how the statute, regulations, and precedent are addressing (or not addressing) issues brought by technological advances, such as market manipulation by algorithmic robots. Class participation is expected. Students will be graded on one long paper and several smaller writing assignments.

Note: This course is part of the following graduate programs: Executive LL.M. in Securities Financial Regulation.

In this course, students will learn structure and execute global securities offerings. The course begins with a brief examination of the process of an SEC-registered offering in the U.S., and the ongoing requirements of SEC reporting companies, and then continues by examining conduct offerings, both domestically and internationally, outside of SEC registration. Topics include the registration requirements of 5 of the Securities Act, the various exceptions from registration, including Sections 4(a)(1), 4(a)(2) and 4(a)(7) of the Securities Act, the safe harbors pursuant to those exemptions, including Regulation S, Regulation D, Rule 144, Rule 144A, and the changes to certain of those rules and regulations by recent legislation, including the JOBS Act and the FAST Act. In addition to a thorough review of the rules and regulations in the course materials, this course seeks to give students insight into how those rules and regulations are used in practice, and into the mechanics of conducting various types of securities offerings, so that upon completing the course students are better prepared to address these topics in practice. The course was jointly developed by a senior SEC staffer and a private practitioner. Note that there is no pre-requisite for this course.

LAW 863 v00 International Business Litigation and Federal Practice.

The course explores issues common to litigation in U.S. courts arising from cross-border business transactions, including venue, jurisdiction, service of process, choice of law questions, discovery, evidence from abroad, privilege and ethical considerations, and the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments in U.S. courts. The course covers the resolution of disputes in litigation, as well as in arbitral proceedings, and through regulatory and other internal investigations, and explores issues such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

This course examines key issues arising from the criminalization of transnational business conduct and attempts to enforce national laws extraterritorially, as well as counsel clients to comply with inconsistent or conflicting legal regimes. Topics covered will include: bribery of foreign officials, crime on the internet, economic embargoes and export and reexport controls, securities fraud, money laundering, and price-fixing. Attention will be paid to foreign governmental opposition to U.S. assertions of jurisdiction via blocking statutes, secrecy laws, and use of local court injunctions, as well as to mechanisms for resolving jurisdictional conflicts, including international agreements for notification, consultation, mutual legal assistance, positive comity, and exchanges of confidential information among enforcement authorities. The course will also focus extensively on compliance and ethics issues and on techniques for dealing with government law enforcement agencies.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent of International Law I, which is a 3 credit course in public international law).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Economic Crime and Corruption.

Note: Please note, the two sections of this course have different requirements. Please be sure to register for CRN 13649 if you wish to elect the section with a final exam and CRN 24229 if you wish to elect the section requiring a paper. The cutoff date to select either an exam or paper requirement is Tuesday, September 7, 2021.

This course focuses on an essential legal obligation placed on money managers in providing services to their clients and prospective clients: complying with a broad variety of fiduciary duties. The course begins with a consideration of the common law concept of a fiduciary and the manner in which the concept has become imbedded in U.S. federal laws applicable to money managers.

Note: This course is part of the following graduate programs: Executive LL.M. in Securities Financial Regulation Securities Financial Law Certificate Securities and Financial Regulation LL.M.

LAW 845 v00 Private Equity, Hedge and Other Private Funds.

This course provides an in-depth look at the structure of, and law applicable to, private funds, which are pooled investment vehicles generally operating outside of the scope of a number of significant U.S. Federal securities laws. Among the investment vehicles we will study private equity, venture capital and hedge funds.

The course will then turn to a consideration over a number of classes of what has become the centerpiece of the U.S. Federal securities laws regulating private funds, the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (the IAA). The next two classes will center on business and marketing considerations faced by investment advisers and managers when organizing and operating private funds and significant business terms and conditions in private fund documents.

LAW 712 v00 Rethinking Securities Regulations the Role of the SEC.

Crisis often brings change. The stock market crash of 1929 prompted Congressional hearings that eventually produced revolutionary legislation: the Securities Act of 19 which regulated U.S. securities offerings and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which regulated securities markets and established the SEC. Like the financial meltdown 80 years ago, the recent financial crisis has sparked a critique of the U.S. financial regulatory system.

The first part of the course will focus on understanding the events that prompted the 19 Act, the 1934 Act, the Investment Company of 1940, the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, and the establishment and growth of the SEC. Perhaps not surprisingly, many of those same policy considerations are driving current discussions within the Commission, in Congress, and in the Administration. The final segment of the course will focus on the future of the SEC and financial regulation in the U.S. We will review reform proposals and other ideas for reorganizing the system. We will have speakers including present and former senior officials from the SEC and the financial industry.

This course is open to both JD and LLM students and is recommended for students who wish to gain a deeper understanding of the SEC or may be considering an externship with the Commission.

We consider strategic considerations from both the SEC and defense practitioner perspective at every critical juncture of an investigation, including whether to self-report and cooperate, whether to assert and protect privileges, and engage with the SEC before, during, and after the Wells process. We also discuss the overlapping roles of federal and state criminal and civil regulatory authorities. We survey the various contexts in which claims under the securities laws may be pursued, including litigation with the SEC and other regulators and class and derivative actions. We use important historical precedents as well as current SEC enforcement developments as the basis for class discussion.

Strongly Recommended: Previous or concurrent registration in Securities Regulation is strongly recommended.

LAW 940 v00 Securities Law and the Internet.

Similar to the change ATM machines brought to retail banking, the Internet has now given Investors the ability to trade without human interaction. Over the last several decades this change has dramatically reduced transaction costs (commission and time), but securities regulators must constantly play catch up. Consequently, in the area of securities, investments, finance and commer

˅ More Details
  • Program Length:  36 Months
  • Credit hours:  23
  • Cost per credit:  -
  • Program Cost:  -
  • Admission deadline:  -
  • Scholarships Available:  Yes
  • GRE Required:  No
Seton Hall University logo
Ranked as:  #137 in Best National University
Tuition:  $39,672
State:  New Jersey
Acceptance:  -

Seton Hall Law School now provides training beyond the J.D. degree to select students, practitioners and scholars in the growing and increasingly complex area of financial services compliance. Interested students may pursue an entirely online LL.M. degree option, or choose to come to campus for in-person instruction. Compliance remains the fastest-growing area in the financial services industry. The increase in federal laws and regulations governing financial institutions and the focus of enforcement placed on the compliance efforts of financial companies creates opportunities for attorneys with demonstrated expertise in financial law and compliance.

Up to 8-credits from an ABA-accredited law school may be accepted. Consideration for transfer of courses completed within 4-years of application.

˅ More Details

Online LL.M. in Financial Services Compliance

  • Program Length:  -
  • Credit hours:  24
  • Cost per credit:  $1,653
  • Program Cost:  $39,672
  • Admission deadline:  -
  • Scholarships Available:  Yes
  • GRE Required:  No

2 universities offer the Master's program in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law.

Which one best suits your need?

Please select a program.
Select a program:
Please choose a course.
Please choose a specialization.
Please choose an option.
Have you taken the GRE?
GRE quantitative field is required. (Minimum: 80 | Maximum: 170)
GRE Verbal field is required. (Minimum: 80 | Maximum: 170)
GRE AWA field is required. (Minimum: 0 | Maximum: 6)
Please choose a type of university.
Type of University:
Education level completed:
Please choose a price interval.
$5000 $80000
Tuition sorting:
Please provide a First Name.
Please provide a Last Name.
Please provide a name.
Please provide your address.
Please, enter valid email address.
Please, enter valid phone.
Please, enter valid phone.

What kind of scholarships are available for Online Master's Programs in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law?

We have 28 scholarships awarding up to $87,000 for Masters program in for Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law, targeting diverse candidates and not restricted to state or school-based programs.

Scholarship nameAmountCredibility
Education Equity Scholarship$1,000High
Law Offices of Jeffrey Lichtman Community Service Scholarship$1,000High
Sparks Law Dream Chasers Scholarship$1,000High
The Fair Divorce Legislation Scholarship$1,000High
Domestic Violence Information Center’s Good Samaritan Scholarship$1,000Medium

Find scholarships and financial aid for Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law graduate programs

$500 $20000

Is it worth getting an online master's degree in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law?

Before you invest 1 - 2 years of your time and anywhere between $20,000 - $60,000 prospective students should think about what is the return on investment on the Master’s degree. Here are some of the statistics from bls.gov.

Can I still apply for scholarships and financial aid even if it is an Online Master's program?

Our team has added the scholarships applicable for Graduate programs and most of these scholarships are only verifying the school you are studying at and the program you have applied to. Most of the time, it does not matter if it is an online master’s program or if it is an on-campus program. For renewable scholarships, you will have to maintain a minimum GPA. Schools will give out financial-aid and need-based aid for online Master’s programs and that can be enquired about at the time of application or after you have been admitted. The great news is that your net tuition cost can further come down with these scholarships.

What is the GRE score required for admission to Master's degree in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law?

2 accredited universities offer an online Master's program in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law. The tuition for an online master's program ranges from $39,672 to $107,182.

Our promise is that we will help you find the accredited college for the online Master's at an affordable price tag. Use our Match me with Online Master's program to find the college that fits your needs and is affordable.

Cheapest Online Masters Program in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law

Which schools do not require GRE/GMAT for Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law Online Masters program?

Quite a few accredited universities have waived off the GRE score requirements for admissions to Online Masters programs.

48 universities offer Master's program in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law. At this time, we do not have any information on online Masters' program in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law that do not require GRE. Check out these universities offering online Master's program

Online Masters in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law

How much does it cost and how to find most affordable Online Master’s in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law?

The cost of the online Master's program can vary between public and private universities and there is a huge range. The tuition for the Master's degree can range from $39,672 per year at Seton Hall University to $39,672 at Seton Hall University. There are numerous options to reduce the cost. The tuition price at a state university is most of the time lower than a private university but a private college offers financial aid and assistantships to deserving candidates.

Career Outlook

Employment of lawyers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations. About 46,000 openings for lawyers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

The median annual wage for lawyers was $126,930 in May 2020. Number of Jobs in 2020 was 804,200.

Employers prefer the candidate with a Master's degree.

Career Opportunities with master's degree in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law


Job Title 2020 median Pay Number of Jobs Job Outlook What they do
Lawyers $126,930 804,200 Employment of lawyers is projected to grow 9 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations. About 46,000 openings for lawyers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Lawyers advise and represent individuals, businesses, and government agencies on legal issues and disputes.
Judges, Magistrate Judges, and Magistrates $124,200 44,900 Overall employment of judges and hearing officers is projected to grow 3 percent from 2020 to 2030, slower than the average for all occupations. Despite limited employment growth, about 2,200 openings for judges and hearing officers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Most of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Judges and hearing officers apply the law by overseeing the legal process in courts.
Administrative Law Judges, Adjudicators, and Hearing Officers $124,200 44,900 Overall employment of judges and hearing officers is projected to grow 3 percent from 2020 to 2030, slower than the average for all occupations. Despite limited employment growth, about 2,200 openings for judges and hearing officers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Most of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Judges and hearing officers apply the law by overseeing the legal process in courts.
Law Teachers, Postsecondary $80,560 1,276,900 Overall employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations. About 139,600 openings for postsecondary teachers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a variety of academic subjects beyond the high school level.
Arbitrators, Mediators, and Conciliators $66,130 6,900 Employment of arbitrators, mediators, and conciliators is projected to grow 10 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations. About 400 openings for arbitrators, mediators, and conciliators are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Arbitrators, mediators, and conciliators facilitate negotiation and dialogue between disputing parties to help resolve conflicts outside of the court system.

How can I compare the Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law online Master's Programs?

Compare the GRE score requirements, admission details, credit requirements and tuition for the Master's Program, from 2 universities offering Online Masters Programs in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law. Compare Online Masters Programs in Banking, Corporate, Finance, and Securities Law

How will you rate the search results?

 0.0 rating, based on 0 reviews

Your review has been sent

Select rating
Your review must be at least 10 characters long
Your review must be not longer than 2000 characters