Top Masters Programs in Slavic Studies

A Slavic Studies master's program is all about diving deep into the languages, literature, cultures, and histories of Slavic-speaking regions in Eastern and Central Europe. Students in this program study things like language, stories, history, and culture to understand the Slavic world better. They often need to learn a Slavic language as part of the program. After finishing, people can go on to work in teaching, research, translating, or jobs related to understanding and appreciating the diverse cultures of the Slavic regions.

Princeton University logo
Ranked as:  #1 in Best National University
Tuition:  $56,470 per year
Total Cost:  $112,940 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  New Jersey
Acceptance:  5.63%
The aim of the Princeton's Slavic Languages and Literatures graduate program is to further interest, knowledge, and scholarship relating to Russia, Slavic Central Europe, and Eurasia, primarily through the cultural humanities. To this end we urge our students to explore new intellectual paths and approaches, having first provided them with a strong background in the Russian literary tradition, an introduction to major schools of theory, and the opportunity to conduct research abroad. (Please note that the program in Slavic Linguistics has been discontinued.). In the early years of graduate study, students use the summer to prepare for generals or to do additional language study abroad (usually in Russia or Eastern Europe). After generals, most use the time to continue researching and writing their dissertation. Because we aim to admit only two students into the program each year, we are able to help them design a program of study and develop a research trajectory that accords with individual scholarly needs and interests. Optional: Applicants may submit a statement with their application, briefly describing how their academic interests, background, or life experiences would advance Princeton’s commitment to diversity within the Graduate School and to training individuals in an increasingly diverse society. Please submit a succinct statement of no more than 500 words. Every student develops and pursues a course of study that provides a comprehensive background and branches into specific areas of interest. Until they pass the general exam, students are required to take at least one graduate seminar within the department each semester. Seminars offered by other departments (e.g., comparative literature, German, music, history, anthropology, art and archaeology) are often relevant to scholarly interests of our students, and we encourage the development of interdisciplinary connections and ideas. Course offerings are augmented by a graduate reading list of both required and recommended works intended to provide students with literacy in the field. Students are expected to have a near-native knowledge of English and Russian. Beyond that they are encouraged, but not required, to achieve fluency in another language. That language is usually French, German, or another Slavic language. The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree is normally an incidental degree on the way to full Ph.D. candidacy and is earned after successfully passing all parts of the general examination. It may also be awarded to students who, for various reasons, leave the Ph.D. program, provided that the following requirement is met: successful completion of at least ten approved courses, at least of eight of which must be graduate-level courses. The department provides graduate students with supervised training in undergraduate teaching. Students normally teach at least two semesters. This experience takes the form of instruction in language courses (elementary or intermediate) and leading discussion sections of Russian literature and culture courses. Such teaching ordinarily begins only after students have completed general examinations. It should be an in-depth essay on a subject that can be treated in 150 to 200 pages. Permanent courses may be offered by the department or program on an ongoing basis, depending on curricular needs, scheduling requirements, and student interest. Not listed below are undergraduate courses and one-time-only graduate courses, which may be found for a specific term through the Registrar’s website. Also not listed are graduate-level independent reading and research courses, which may be approved by the Graduate School for individual students. RUS 550 Russian for Academic Purposes IIIn this course, graduate students continue developing skills required to perform in a Russian-speaking academic context across core subject areas of literary analysis and cultural studies. Students are expected to discuss and assess the results of their research and present papers in their field of study at a mock conference in Russian. The course includes a comprehensive review of Russian grammar and syntax as well as academic genres and styles. SLA 535 Methods of Teaching RussianA practical course required of graduate students who are teaching beginning Russian. The course covers all issues relevant to the teaching of the language: phonetics, grammar presentation, efficient use of class time, class and syllabus planning, writing quizzes and tests. In addition to weekly meetings with the instructors, students are expected to meet as a group to develop best practices for covering each week's material. An important part of the course is instructor supervision of teaching. The course is mandatory for all graduate students in the department, who take it either their first or second year of study. SLA 599 Slavic Dissertation ColloquiumA practical course devoted to scholarly writing intended to facilitate the proposal and dissertation writing process. The seminar meets every three to four weeks. Dissertation writers circulate work in progress for feedback and discuss issues that arise in the course of their work. The seminar is required of all post-generals students in Russian literature who are in residence.
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Slavic Languages and Literature

  • GRE Required:  Yes
  • Research Assistantships:  733
  • Teaching Assistantships:  655
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Yale University logo
Ranked as:  #3 in Best National University
Tuition:  $44,500 per year
Total Cost:  $89,000 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Connecticut
Acceptance:  6.53%

The Combined Ph.D. Program in Film Studies and Slavic Languages and Literatures.

The courses in the Slavic Department should normally cover nineteenth and twentieth Russian century literature. The language requirements for admission to candidacy are the same as for Slavic graduate students. In order to advance to candidacy, students must take four comprehensive examinations in the Slavic Department during their third year of study. These comprise two written exams, one on nineteenth century literature and one on twentieth century literature, an oral exam on Russian film, and an oral “pre-prospectus” exam on the topic of their dissertation prospectus.

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The Combined Ph.D. Program in Film Studies and Slavic Languages and Literatures

  • GRE Required:  Yes
  • Research Assistantships:  1565
  • Teaching Assistantships:  1598
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Harvard University logo
Ranked as:  #3 in Best National University
Tuition:  $50,654 per year
Total Cost:  $101,308 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Massachusetts
Acceptance:  5.01%

Slavic Linguistics are normally fulfilled during the first two years of study. All students are required to demonstrate graduate-level knowledge of the language of the major field. If a student’s major linguistic area is a Slavic language other than Russian, one of the four required courses for the major must be on Russian language. Graduate students will study at least one language in addition to their major language. Many students choose to pursue a second Slavic language (Ukrainian, Polish, Czech, or BCS). It makes sense to begin this study in the first year, perhaps followed up by a summer program abroad after the first and/or second year of study.

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Slavic Languages and Literatures

  • GRE Required:  Yes
  • Research Assistantships:  864
  • Teaching Assistantships:  1388
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Stanford University logo
Ranked as:  #3 in Best National University
Tuition:  $55,011 per year
Total Cost:  $110,022 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  California
Acceptance:  5.19%

The Slavic Languages and Literatures department supports coordinated study of Russian language, literature, literary and cultural history, theory, and criticism. The department's programs may also be combined with the programs in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, Jewish Studies, Film Studies, Drama, International Relations, Stanford's Overseas Studies, and the Special Languages Program. The department is a part of the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages.

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Slavic Languages and Literatures

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University of Chicago logo
Ranked as:  #6 in Best National University
Tuition:  $61,548 per year
Total Cost:  $123,096 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Illinois
Acceptance:  7.31%

The Department of Slavic Linguistics and Languages offers options to specialize in Slavic Linguistics (Historical or Synchronic) or Contact Linguistics. The option to pursue a joint degree in the Linguistics broadens the opportunities for students in Slavic Linguistics.

Common MA Core Courses:The common core courses required of all students are: Introduction to Slavic Linguistics Old Church Slavonic Structure of Russian History of Russian and advanced knowledge of Russian (this requirement may be met by successfully completing 5th-year Russian).

Slavic Linguistics (Historical or Synchronic):Students specializing in Historical or Synchronic Slavic linguistics are expected to demonstrate proficiency in reading a second Slavic language (this second requirement may be met by satisfactorily completing all work of a one-year language course), and courses in the history and structure of the second Slavic language. Two courses in literature or interdisciplinary studies are also required. Comparative Slavic is required for the specialization in Historical linguistics and Advanced Structure of Russian for the Synchronic linguistics.

PhD: Students who have been advanced to the Ph.D. program are expected to demonstrate mastery of their discipline as well as research skills by completion of a Qualifying Paper by the end of the spring quarter of their third year for continuation in the program. The topic of this paper is to be determined in consultation with the adviser. Successful completion of this Qualifying Paper is a prerequisite to defense of the dissertation proposal.

Common PhD Core courses:All students are required to take general linguistics courses in Phonetics Phonology and Syntax, a research seminar, and at least one upper-level seminar in Slavic or general linguistics.

Historical Slavic Linguistics:In addition to the core courses, the track in Historical Slavic Linguistics requires: Introduction to Indo-European and Introduction to Historical linguistics, and a reading knowledge of one additional Slavic languages, so that East, West, and South Slavic languages are all represented.

Synchronic Slavic Linguistics:In addition to the core courses, the track in Synchronic Slavic Linguistics requires: Advanced Structure of Russian, a second advanced seminar in Slavic or general linguistics (to be determined in consultation with the adviser) and a reading knowledge of one additional Slavic languages, so that East, West, and South Slavic languages are all represented.

For exact details of each course of study, please consult the Slavic Department Graduate Student Manual.

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The Slavic Languages and Literatures

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Northwestern University logo
Ranked as:  #10 in Best National University
Tuition:  $56,567 per year
Total Cost:  $113,134 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Illinois
Acceptance:  9.31%

Northwestern Doctoral Program in Slavic Languages and Literatures, one of the best in the country, specializes in Russian literature and culture. It focuses on the readings of major works, their relation to cultural and intellectual history, and the questions they raise for problems of literary criticism and theory.

See Slavic Languages Degree Requirements for specific classes and procedures needed to complete this program.

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Slavic Languages and Literatures

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Brown University logo
Ranked as:  #13 in Best National University
Tuition:  $60,363 per year
Total Cost:  $120,726 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Rhode Island
Acceptance:  7.67%

The Slavic Languages offers a comprehensive doctoral program in Slavic studies specializing in Russian literature and culture, in modern Czech culture and in Polish literature and culture.

The program will train flexible and innovative scholars able to address varying teaching and research needs in the future job market. Students receive close guidance and are mentored in the pedagogy of language and literature culture teaching.

Slavic library and reading room, commons room for lectures and presentations, audiovisual equipment.

Advanced competence in Russian. Knowledge interest in another Slavic language (preferably Czech or Polish) is encouraged but not required.

Sixteen courses, including five graduate seminars, and two to four courses in a secondary field of study theory and methods of foreign language teaching, reading knowledge of the second language related to the student specialization teaching qualifying examinations dissertation and defense.

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Graduate Programs

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Columbia University in the City of New York logo
Ranked as:  #18 in Best National University
Tuition:  $51,194 per year
Total Cost:  $102,388 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  New York
Acceptance:  6.66%

The Barnard-Columbia Slavic Department offers instruction in six Slavic languages and literature (Russian, Bulgarian, Czech, Polish, Serbian/ Croatian/ Bosnian, and Ukrainian), with particularly extensive offerings in Russian. The department prides itself on giving students a strong foundation in language study, which serves as invaluable preparation for future graduate work in literature, history, economics, or political science, as well as for careers in government, business, journalism, or international law.

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Slavic

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University of California-Los Angeles logo
Ranked as:  #20 in Best National University
Tuition:  $28,131 per year
Total Cost:  $56,262 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  California
Acceptance:  14.33%

UCLA’s Department of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Languages and Cultures is known as an unusually rich program. As our new website shows, we are one of the exceptional departments still able to offer courses covering all periods of Slavic culture, from medieval to 21st century, as well as cutting-edge training in pedagogy and a range of East European languages and cultures. Cooperation with other world-class programs at the university offers the possibility of inter-disciplinary research in media, digital studies, theory, translation, history and religion.

Graduate students are encouraged to think outside the box and pursue their passions rather than to follow the beaten track. Generous funding is available for every wish from pizza parties to workshops and conferences, from guest lectures and research travel to networking with specialists around the globe. Our pride in our students’ achievements is confirmed by their record of tenure-track job placements, post-doctoral positions, grants and publications.

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Slavic, East European Eurasian Languages Cultures

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University of California-Berkeley logo
Ranked as:  #20 in Best National University
Tuition:  $29,347 per year
Total Cost:  $58,694 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  California
Acceptance:  17.48%

The Slavic Languages and Literatures PhD graduate program is designed to train future scholars and teachers of Slavic languages and literatures. Students specialize either in literature or linguistics, combining a core curriculum with independent research early in their graduate career.

Students are admitted to the PhD or MA PhD program only the department will not consider applicants for the MA only.

The program in literature and culture provides a thorough knowledge of the evolving literary canon along with attendant historical contexts while encouraging students to acquire expertise in literary and cultural theory.

Slavic students may pursue official designated emphases in Film, Folklore, Women Gender and Sexuality Studies, Critical Theory, or Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, as well as individually designed areas of specialization. The Slavic Department works in collaboration with the departments of Comparative Literature, Linguistics, Anthropology, History, Theater, Music, Art History, and with the Institute of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies, which houses the Berkeley Program in Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies and The Caucasus and Central Asia Program.

The majority of students at Berkeley choose Russian as their major language. We encourage students who wish to explore the diverse literary and cultural traditions of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia. We accept a small number of students who choose Polish, Bulgarian or BCS (Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian) language and literature as their major field in such cases, special programs are established and students do much of their graduate work independently. These students normally take Russian as a minor field. Berkeley does not administer a PhD Program in Czech, but Czech can be chosen as the second Slavic language.

The Slavic linguistics concentration of our program has been considerably reduced in recent years.

The following minimum requirements apply to all graduate programs and will be verified by the Graduate Division:.

If the applicant has completed a basic degree from a country or political entity (e.g., Quebec) where English is not the official language, adequate proficiency in English to do graduate work, as evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 90 on the iBT test, 570 on the paper-and-pencil test, or an IELTS Band score of at least 7 on a 9-point scale (note that individual programs may set higher levels for any of these) and.

The Graduate Council views academic degrees not as vocational training certificates, but as evidence of broad training in research methods, independent study, and articulation of learning. Therefore, applicants who already have academic graduate degrees should be able to pursue new subject matter at an advanced level without the need to enroll in a related or similar graduate program.

Applicants with doctoral degrees may be admitted for an additional doctoral degree only if that degree program is in a general area of knowledge distinctly different from the field in which they earned their original degree.

Applicants may apply only to one single degree program or one concurrent degree program per admission cycle.

Unofficial transcripts must contain specific information including the name of the applicant, name of the school, all courses, grades, units, degree conferral (if applicable).

Letters of recommendation: Applicants may request online letters of recommendation through the online application system. Hard copies of recommendation letters must be sent directly to the program, by the recommender, not the Graduate Admissions.

Evidence of English language proficiency:All applicants who have completed a basic degree from a country or political entity in which the official language is not English are required to submit official evidence of English language proficiency. However, applicants who, at the time of application, have already completed at least one year of full-time academic course work with grades of B or better at a US university may submit an official transcript from the US university to fulfill this requirement. The following courses will not fulfill this requirement:.

Courses conducted in a language other than English,.

Courses that will be completed after the application is submitted, and.

Official TOEFL score reports must be sent directly from Educational Test Services (ETS). Official IELTS score reports must be sent electronically from the testing center to University of California, Berkeley, Graduate Division, Sproul Hall, Rm 318 MC 5900, Berkeley, CA 94720. TOEFL and IELTS score reports are only valid for two years prior to beginning the graduate program at UC Berkeley. Note: score reports can not expire before the month of June.

We select our graduate students on the basis of prior academic achievement and promise of success in scholarship and teaching. Students admitted to the PhD program with an MA in Slavic or a related field from another institution are required to pass a screening (permission-to-proceed) examination. Students who have earned the MA degree from this department may receive permission to proceed to the PhD program following successful performance on the MA comprehensive examinations and demonstrated aptitude for advanced work. The department does not accept applications for a terminal MA program of study.

SLAVIC Literature electives, as per specialized study list.

SLAVIC Linguistics electives, as per specialized study list.

Students of linguistics are required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of either French or German before taking the MA exams. They must demonstrate a reading knowledge of both before taking the PhD exams.

Students of literature are required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of either French or German before taking their MA exams. As an alternative, students of literature have the option to complete two semesters of a second Slavic language on a letter-grade basis. Students may, with prior permission granted on an individual basis and with a view to pursuing specific research goals, fulfill this requirement by studying a non-Slavic language from a region within the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe (e.g., Armenian, Georgian, Estonian, and Hungarian).

At the beginning of the semester in which the examination is taken, students who will take the PhD qualifying exam must file the Application for the Qualifying Examination. Note that it requires the names of the student examination committee (including the outside member). By the Graduate Division rules, applicants must list at least three subject areas in which the candidate will be examined. Students in our department list their major and minor fields (literature) or three subject areas (linguistics) as well as the general field for all students: Russian language (or another major Slavic language). The completed form must be signed by the graduate adviser, and if applicable, the designated emphasis graduate adviser. The form is then submitted to the Graduate Division for approval.

Print and fill the form if necessary, consult with the graduate assistant .

Make a copy for your department file and hand it to the graduate assistant and.

Deliver the form to 318 Sproul Hall, Graduate Division.

Research Requirement (qualifying paper or publishable paper): All graduate students are required to submit an extended research paper (on a topic of their choice) to satisfy the departmental research requirement. Usually, but not necessarily, the research paper is a revised and expanded version of a course seminar paper. In some cases, this paper may further lead to a dissertation topic. The paper is submitted to the graduate adviser at the end of the third year (or by exception, at the beginning of the semester which precedes the exam). In some cases, additional revisions of the paper may be asked, which makes timing essential.

Advancement to candidacy is an important official procedure. To qualify for advancement, a student must have passed the qualifying examinations and completed all other requirements for the degree (course requirements and language requirements).

The dissertation prospectus is a detailed outline of the project. The department requires that a student complete an approved prospectus by the end of the semester following the PhD qualifying examination.

The prospectus generally includes a justification of the topic and a description of methodology, objectives, available scholarly literature, the potential relevance of the work, and the structure of the dissertation and includes a working bibliography.

The doctoral dissertation represents the final demonstration, in the graduate program, of a student research and scholarly abilities, and constitutes an original contribution to the field of study. The dissertation must receive the unanimous approval of the committee members in order for it to be accepted as final completion of the degree requirements.

Expand all course descriptions [+]Collapse all course descriptions [-].

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2020, Spring 2018 Introduction to Old Church Slavic, with special attention to inflexional morphology. Assigned translations and sight reading of selected texts.Old Church Slavic: [+].

Terms offered: Spring 2021, Fall 2018, Fall 2016 Assigned translations and sight reading of selected Medieval Orthodox Slavic texts.Medieval Orthodox Slavic Texts: [+].

Terms offered: Fall 2011, Fall 2008, Fall 2005 Reconstruction of Common Slavic phonology and morphology in relation to Indo-European and modern Slavic languages.Comparative Slavic Linguistics: [+].

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Fall 2020, Fall 2018 Survey of morphology and syntax of a contemporary Slavic language (Czech, Polish, Russian, or Serbian Croatian) see departmental announcement for topic. Recommended for prospective teachers.Descriptive Grammar of Slavic Languages: [+].

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit without restriction.

Descriptive Grammar of Slavic Languages: Read Less [-].

SLAVIC 223Advanced Structure of Slavic Languages: Grammatical Analysis and Theory4 Units.

Terms offered: Fall 2008 Analysis of synchronic grammar and structure of discourse of a Slavic language (Czech, Polish, Russian, or Serbian Croatian) with attention to theoretical models see Department announcement for topic.Advanced Structure of Slavic Languages: Grammatical Analysis and Theory: [+].

Advanced Structure of Slavic Languages: Grammatical Analysis and Theory: Read Less [-].

Terms offered: Spring 2011, Fall 2009, Spring 2004 Historical phonology, morphology, and syntax of a Slavic language (Czech, Polish, Russian, or Serbian Croatian). Some coverage of dialectology. See Department announcement for topic.Historical Grammar of Slavic Languages: [+].

Historical Grammar of Slavic Languages: Read Less [-].

Terms offered: Spring 2012, Spring 2006, Spring 2004 Analysis of language and style of a Slavic literary language (Czech, Polish, Russian, or Serbian Croatian) from the beginnings to the present, with emphasis on periods of particular significance. See Department announcement for topic.History of Slavic Literary Languages: [+].

Prerequisites: Advanced knowledge of the modern language, 210 214 and at least one advanced or graduate level literature course.

History of Slavic Literary Languages: Read Less [-].

Terms offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2006, Fall 2001 Linguistic history and dialectology of Slovenian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, and Serbian Croatian.South Slavic Linguistics: [+].

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Spring 2017, Spring 2014 Attempts to describe literary forms, poetic usage of language, and cultural infrastructure, as a code, examined as a consistent trend in 20th-Century literary theory. Consideration of this scholarly trend in historical perspective its sources, evolution, and eventual dissipation.Twentieth-Century Slavic Literary Theory: [+].

Terms offered: Fall 2020, Fall 2017, Spring 2016 Studies in poetry, drama, and fiction, covering major figures between 1730 and the end of the century.Eighteenth-Century Russian Literature: [+].

Terms offered: Fall 2021, Spring 2019, Spring 2016 Coverage of major movements and genres in the intellectual context of the times. Readings in Russian.Contemporary Russian Literature (1920-present): [+].

Terms offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2009, Spring 1998 This seminar addresses the problems and methods of cultural history within the Russian context. Special attention will be given to the social, political, and historical matrices which determine (and may be determined by) aesthetic production, as well as to the role of culture in the construction of everyday life. Topic and period variable. Instruction in English texts in English and Russian.

Terms offered: Spring 2017, Spring 2014, Spring 2013 Selected topics in Slavic folklore, with focus on contributions to folklore theory based on Slavic material.Topics in Slavic Folklore: [+].

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.

SLAVIC 258Languages, Peoples, and Cultures of the Greater Slavic World4 Units.

Terms offered: Spring 2010 Topics in the languages, peoples, and cultures of Eastern and Central Europe, the CIS, and diasporas. Topics vary as to region (e.g., Northeastern Europe, the Baltic Coast, the Caucasus) and approach (e.g., sociolinguistics, ethnolinguistics, studies of ethnic and language minorities). Readings include sources in the original languages of the area.Languages, Peoples, and Cultures of the Greater Slavic World: [+].

Languages, Peoples, and Cultures of the Greater Slavic World: Read Less [-].

SLAVIC 280Studies in Slavic Literature and Linguistics4 Units.

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2021 Advanced studies in the several fields of Slavic literatures and linguistics. Content varies.Studies in Slavic Literature and Linguistics: [+].

Studies in Slavic Literature and Linguistics: Read Less [-].

SLAVIC 281Proseminar: Aims and Methods of Literary Scholarship4 Units.

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Fall 2021, Fall 2020 Course designed for new graduate students in literature. Introduction to modern literary theory and criticism principles of textual analysis methods of bibliographical research.Proseminar: Aims and Methods of Literary Scholarship: [+].

SLAVIC 282Proseminar: Aims and Methods of Linguistic Scholarship4 Units.

Terms offered: Fall 2010, Spring 2009, Spring 2006 Course designed for new graduate students in Slavic linguistics. A survey of general and Slavic linguistics, Slavic philology, semiotics, and the relation of linguistics to literary studies. Methods of research and critical analysis. Current issues and goals of research.Proseminar: Aims and Methods of Linguistic Scholarship: [+].

Terms offered: Fall 2014, Spring 2012, Spring 2009 A survey of the religious history and thought of Eastern Europe and the Levant with an intent of providing greater insight into the shaping of faith and cultures of both halves of Europe.Eastern Christianity: History and Thought: [+].

SLAVIC 298Special Study for Graduate Students2 8 Units.

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Fall 2022, Spring 2022 Preliminary exploration of a restricted field involving research and a written report.Special Study for Graduate Students: [+].

Special Study for Graduate Students: Read Less [-].

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Fall 2022, Spring 2022 Normally reserved for students directly engaged upon the doctoral dissertation.Directed Research: [+].

Terms offered: Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012 Independent study. Consideration of special issues in the teaching of Slavic languages. Offered according to interest and need.Issues in Slavic Pedagogy: [+].

Prerequisites: Graduate status in the Slavic Languages and Literatures.

SLAVIC 310Internship in the Teaching of Literature Linguistics1 2 Units.

Discussion of course aims, syllabus preparation, lecture and assignment planning, grading, and related matters. Students may prepare a representative portion of the work for such a course (e.g., lecture outline and assignments for a course segment) and may participate in presentation of the material and in evaluation of samples of student work.Internship in the Teaching of Literature Linguistics: [+].

Internship in the Teaching of Literature Linguistics: Read Less [-].

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Fall 2022, Spring 2022 Course on practical teaching methods, grading, testing, and design of supplementary course materials.

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing and teaching appointment in the Slavic Languages and Literatures.

Teaching Methods for Slavic Languages: Read Less [-].

SLAVIC 375BTeaching Methods of Reading and Composition3 Units.

SLAVIC 601Individual Study for Master Students2 8 Units.

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Fall 2022, Spring 2022 Individual study for the comprehensive or language requirements in consultation with a field adviser.Individual Study for Master Students: [+].

Repeat rules: Course may be repeated for credit up to a total of 16 units.

Individual Study for Master Students: Read Less [-].

SLAVIC 602Individual Study for Doctoral Students2 8 Units.

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Fall 2022, Spring 2022 Individual study in consultation with a major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D.Individual Study for Doctoral Students: [+].

Credit Restrictions: Course does not satisfy unit or residence requirements for doctoral degree.

Individual Study for Doctoral Students: Read Less [-].

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Fall 2021, Fall 2020 An introduction to Armenian language and culture, aiming to give students basic competence in all four skills and an introduction to traditional and contemporary Armenian culture.Introductory Armenian: [+].

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Spring 2021 An introduction to Armenian language and culture, aiming to give students basic competence in all four skills and an introduction to traditional and contemporary Armenian culture.Introductory Armenian: [+].

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Fall 2021, Fall 2020 The purpose of this course is to further develop students' Armenian proficiency in all four language skills, using discussion, oral presentations, written assignments, and a variety of readings (literature, non-fiction, folklore, newspaper articles, etc.) chosen partly for their cultural significance and partly based on student needs and interests. Emphasis on particular skills (e.g. reading) depending on student needs and interests.Continuing Armenian: [+].

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Spring 2021 The purpose of this course is to further develop students' Armenian proficiency in all four language skills, using discussion, oral presentations, written assignments, and a variety of readings (literature, non-fiction, folklore, newspaper articles, etc.) chosen partly for their cultural significance and partly based on student needs and interests. Emphasis on particular skills (e.g. reading) depending on student needs and interests.Continuing Armenian: [+].

Language skills and to link language competence to the study of the contemporary politics, culture, and society in Armenia and the Armenian diaspora.

Terms offered: Spring 2022, Spring 2020, Spring 2018 This course covers selected works and topics in Armenian literature treated in a broad socio-cultural context. Lectures, readings and discussions in English. No knowledge of Armenian language is required (students with knowledge of Armenian read in the original).Armenian Literature in Social Context: [+].

Armenian Literature in Social Context: Read Less [-].

Lectures, readings and discussions in English. No knowledge of Armenian language is required (students with knowledge of Armenian read in the original).Armenian Culture and Film: [+].

ARMENI 128Arts and Culture in Armenia and the Diaspora Since 19913 Units.

The course examines contemporary developments in the arts in the context of the major socio-political changes of the period.Arts and Culture in Armenia and the Diaspora Since 1991: [+].

Arts and Culture in Armenia and the Diaspora Since 1991: Read Less [-].

Terms offered: Fall 2022, Fall 2021, Fall 2020 Beginner course.

Terms offered: Spring 2023, Spring 2022, Spring 2021 Beginner course.

Formerly known as: Slavic Languages and Literatures 117A.

Formerly known as: Slavic Languages and Literatures 117B.

Terms offered: Prior to 2007 Sequence begins in the fall. Practical instruction in the Bulgarian language with a focus on integrated skills (reading, grammar, conversation). Course offered as staffing permits.Introductory Bulgarian: [+].

Formerly known as: Slavic Languages and Literatures 28A.

Formerly known as: Slavic Languages and Literatures 28B.

Terms offered: Prior to 2007 This course consists of a review of Bulgarian grammar covered in 28A-28B, a thorough presentation of the complex verbal tense-mood system and readings in contemporary Bulgarian prose.Continuing Bulgarian: [+].

Formerly known as: Slavic Languages and Literatures 118A.

Terms offered: Prior to 2007 This course is a contin

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Slavic Languages and Literatures University of California, Berkeley

  • GRE Required:  Register to view the details
  • Research Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Teaching Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details

What kind of scholarships are available for Graduate Programs in Slavic Studies?

We have 3 scholarships awarding up to $37,500 for Masters program in for Slavic Studies, targeting diverse candidates and not restricted to state or school-based programs.

Scholarship nameAmountCredibility
Graduate Teaching Assistantships in Department of Spanish and Portuguese at IUB$22,000
Graduate Assistantships for Master of Arts in Spanish program at the UC$8,000
Mellon Emerging Faculty Leaders Award$7,500Medium

Find scholarships and financial aid for Slavic Studies graduate programs

$500 $20000

Are there any one year masters programs in Slavic Studies?

2 Universities offer On-campus Masters Program within an One Year - 18 months. The tuition for Master's can range from $0 to $0.

On-campus Masters 1 year - 18 months in Slavic Studies

Which are the accredited universities that offer phd/doctoral programs offered in Slavic Studies?

16 universities offer graduate PHD program in Slavic Studies

Best Slavic Studies graduate PHD programs

Are there universities offering online Master's in Slavic Studies?

Best Online Masters Programs in Slavic Studies - Updated 2023 Online Master's in Slavic Studies

Are there colleges for the Slavic Studies Masters program that do not require GRE/GMAT?

Quite a few accredited universities have waived off the GRE score requirements for admissions to Masters programs. 28 offer Graduate programs in Slavic Studies. Below are listed 5 universities that do not require GRE/GMAT for admission to Master's program. For viewing the all the schools that have waived off GRE/GMAT for the admission, use Match Me Masters.

No GRE schools for Masters in Slavic Studies

How much does it cost to get a Master's in Slavic Studies and how to find the most affordable Masters program?

Master's degree in Slavic Studies is offered by 28 US universities. The tuition for the Master's degree can range from $31,930 per year at Boston College to $50,654 at Harvard University.

The tuition at public universities will be lower for in-state students when compared to private universities but you get more financial aid at private universities.

Most affordable Master's program in Slavic Studies

What is the GRE score required for admission to Master's degree in Slavic Studies?

Gre score requirements differ from school to school. Most colleges do not publish the cutoff scores. For example 28 universities offer Master's programs in Slavic Studies.

University of California-Berkeley: The program requires GRE scores , or TOEFL , a statement of purpose, a personal statement, and critical writing samples Writing samples should be in the form of thesis or research paper on a topic relevant to the fields of German literature or linguistics

University of Virginia-Main Campus: Applicants with GRE scores than five years old should take the test again.

Gre score requirements for Master's program in Slavic Studies

Is it worth getting a master's degree in Slavic Studies?

Before you invest 2-3 years of your life and anywhere between $40,000 - $110,00 of your hard earned money, students do ask as to what is the return on investment on the Master's degree. Here are some of the statistics from bls.gov.


Career Outlook

Overall employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations. About 139,600 openings for postsecondary teachers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

The median annual wage for postsecondary teachers was $80,560 in May 2020. Number of Jobs in 2020 was 1,276,900.

Career Opportunities with master's degree in Slavic Studies


Job Title 2020 median Pay Number of Jobs Job Outlook What they do Area, Ethnic, and Cultural Studies Teachers, Postsecondary $80,560 1,276,900 Overall employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations. About 139,600 openings for postsecondary teachers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a variety of academic subjects beyond the high school level.


How can I compare the Slavic Studies Graduate Programs?

Compare the GRE score requirements, admission details, credit requirements and tuition for the Master's Program, from 28 universities offering Graduate School Programs in Slavic Studies. Compare Graduate School Programs in Slavic Studies

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