Top Masters Programs in Theology and Theological Studies

35 universities offer graduate programs in Theology and Theological Studies. Liberty University had 16 international graduate students in its 35 program, which is one of the highest counts in the country. Liberty University had the most women graduates in this program.

Yale University logo
Ranked as:  #3 in Best National University
Tuition:  $44,500 per year
Total Cost:  $89,000 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Connecticut
Acceptance:  6.53%

AcademicsOrganization of the CurriculumArea I Biblical Studies.

This area is concerned with the interpretation of the Christian Scriptures in the broadest sense, including the study of the classical biblical languages (Hebrew and Greek), the content of the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, critical methods of interpretation, biblical history, cultural and historical milieu of the Bible, and the theological and pastoral implications of the text.

Introductory courses are offered in the critical study of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Except for the language courses, all courses in Area I normally have these foundation courses (or their equivalent) as prerequisites.

Language courses are offered at the elementary, intermediate, and advanced levels. Generally, elementary biblical languages are eligible for elective credit only.

Three types of exegesis courses are offered: those based on the English text those based on the original text and requiring a working knowledge of the biblical language and advanced exegesis seminars that require at least an intermediate knowledge of the biblical language. Exegesis courses of each type are offered each term on selected books or topics from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament.

Thematic courses are offered on a wide range of theological and historical issues raised by the scriptures. These include courses on the cultural and historical milieu of the Bible.

Advanced seminars are designed for YDS students with the requisite background and qualifications, and for doctoral students.

YDS offers intensive courses in elementary Biblical Hebrew and elementary New Testament Greek for six weeks during the summer. Such work earns six hours of academic credit and prepares the student for the course in exegesis. Summer work will satisfy most denominational language requirements.

˅ More Details

Yale Divinity School - Biblical Studies

  • GRE Required:  Yes
  • Research Assistantships:  1565
  • Teaching Assistantships:  1598
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
Harvard University logo
Ranked as:  #3 in Best National University
Tuition:  $50,654 per year
Total Cost:  $101,308 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Massachusetts
Acceptance:  5.01%

The master of theological studies (MTS) degree offers students the opportunity to explore how different elements of religion relate to language, culture, and the evolution of different faith traditions.

The MTS program is a two-year full-time degree with eighteen areas of focus that allow for diverse educational interests and vocational goals.

The program may be preparatory work for a doctoral program in religion or related discipline the program may also inform another field or profession, such as law, journalism, public policy, education, arts, or medicine, from a perspective enriched by theological study.

View a comparison chart of MTS program and other HDS degree offerings.

Conduct research using the methods appropriate to at least one subfield within the academic study of religion, or apply the fruits of research to a particular problem.

African and African American Religious Studies Courses in this area explore various dimensions of the religious experiences and expressions of the African and African American peoples, including the African diaspora.

Buddhist Studies Courses in this area foster the understanding of Buddhists and the life-worlds they have created, historically across Asia as well as in contemporary settings around the globe. This understanding is cultivated through self-reflective interpretations of Buddhist ideas, values, texts, languages, institutions, practices, and experiences, with the expectation that these interpretations will lead to both appreciation and critique of Buddhism, in all its diversity, as a human heritage.

Comparative Studies Courses in this area include the comparative study of religion and anthropology, comparative theology, and comparative ethics. They involve the disciplined study of the complex relationships among themes and concepts, as well as the study of texts, practices, and images, in two or religious traditions. Such studies by definition involve a self-reflexive, critical analysis of comparison itself. Some courses may be entirely methodological and or theoretical in content, but the emphasis is normally on concrete comparative practice. Students are urged to cultivate knowledge of at least two traditions by the study of them throughout their program.

While many courses focus on a particular religious community and or tradition, others consider the richly complex interactions among various religious communities in China, Japan, and Korea.

The courses are designed to serve both students with no knowledge of biblical languages as well as those who have studied Hebrew, Greek, and or other ancient languages relating to the Bible and who seek to continue building their linguistic foundation for further study.

Hindu Studies Courses in this area foster the understanding of Hindu thought and practice both in India and throughout the global Hindu diaspora. Students are also encouraged to undertake the study of Sanskrit and other relevant languages.

History of Christianity Courses in this area study Christianity in its evolving institutional, theological, devotional, social, cultural, and intellectual expressions from the first century to the present. In addition, the area offers courses in historical method, historiography, and interpretive issues in secondary literature.

Islamic Studies Courses in this area study different dimensions of the long and varied history and contemporary reality of the Islamic tradition. Islamic art, law, politics, and theology, Islamic mysticism, Islamic constructions of gender, pre-modern Islamic culture, and other topics are explored within the Arabic-, Persian-, and Turkish-speaking societies of the Muslim-majority world, South, Central, and Southeast Asia, Africa, and or the modern Western world.

Jewish Studies Courses in this area explore the Jewish tradition as it has developed over the millennia. Methodologically, it makes use of a number of diverse but interrelated approaches: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and sociological. The language most relevant to Jewish Studies is Hebrew, though for work in some areas, others, such as Aramaic or Yiddish, may also prove essential.

New Testament and Early ChristianityCourses in this area focus on the interdisciplinary study of Christian literature (canonical and extracanonical), history, exegesis, and theology in the context of the ancient Mediterranean world, with special emphasis on hermeneutics, feminist interpretation, and material culture.

Philosophy of Religion Courses in this area engage in the philosophical interpretation and evaluation of religion, religious belief, and religious practice. Questions include the nature of religion, religious experience, and religious language the status and justification of religious belief the relationship between religion and ethics, and between religion and aesthetics and theories of practice relative to the interplay of religious subjectivity and ritual. Work in this area can be pursued in relationship to European and American philosophy, the philosophical traditions of Asia, and or comparative studies.

Religion and the Social Sciences Courses in this area attempt to explicate and account for connections between religious phenomena and several aspects of society including the organization of cultural, political, economic, and reproductive life. This area approaches forms of religious faith, religious experience, and religious organization from post-enlightenment perspectives associated with the disciplines of anthropology, sociology, social psychology, political and economic science, and sociobiology.

Religion, Ethics, and Politics Courses in this area focus on a range of normative issues that arise within political cultures. This area encourages students to understand the many social, cultural, and political contexts in which human agents are formed and take action. Special attention is given to the distinctive role that religious beliefs, practices, codes, and s play in shaping ethical subjects or instructing their dispositions and choices. The area is intentionally interdisciplinary and exposes students to normative issues within a variety of the world religious traditions.

Religion, Literature, and Culture Courses in this area provide students with the historical and critical methods necessary to analyze literary texts from a variety of genres (poetry, biography), religious traditions (Buddhism, Christianity), and cultural perspectives (Latin America, South Asia). Recognizing the intersectionality of religion, literature, and culture, this area combines literary and cultural criticism with theological and religious analysis. It also recognizes the aesthetic dimension of religion as a basis for understanding such themes as myth, ritual, and transcendence in much of world literature.

Religions of the Americas Courses in this area explore the diverse religious traditions and expressions of the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, and Latin America. Historical, ethnographic, and comparative approaches are brought to bear on immigrant, indigenous, diasporic, and new religions. While some courses take broadly hemispheric and multireligious perspectives, others focus in depth on particular geographical areas, traditions, or themes.

While many courses focus on a particular religious community and or tradition, others consider the richly complex interactions among various religious groups in South Asia and the South Asian global diaspora. Students in this area are encouraged to explore the religious cultures of the region broadly, including relevant classical and or modern languages.

Theology Courses in this area focus on all modes of the Christian tradition self-understandings of its faith and practice in historical, contemporary, and comparative contexts. The study of theology involves the articulation of diverse understandings of central topics such as God, salvation, and the Church analyses of the contexts of, constraints on, and methods of theological reflection and reasoning the relation of Christianity to other religions and the relation of theology to other pursuits of knowledge and practices of self-understanding.

Women, Gender, Sexuality, and Religion Courses in this area use gender and or sexuality as categories of analysis across the disciplines of religious and theological studies. The area engages feminist theory in relation to the experiences, thoughts, texts, and practices of both men and women as well as highlighting previously neglected areas of women religiosity.

(Note: individually designed programs should be created based on the course offerings and capacity of HDS to support that area as a field of study.) Not all courses available and of interest belong to an area of focus. The program is designed with sufficient flexibility to allow selection from among all course offerings. Students are encouraged to select these courses when appropriate to their interests or program.

The courses must be taken for a letter grade and the student must receive grades of B or higher.

Residency requirement: students must complete four courses each in two of their first three consecutive terms.

Thirteen of the sixteen required classes must be taken for a letter grade, three may be taken on a satisfactory unsatisfactory basis.

B average must be maintained throughout the program.

Language study at Harvard Divinity School is one of the highlights of many students' experience. Master of theological studies (MTS) students must satisfy a language competency requirement by demonstrating intermediate reading competency in a language of scholarship in theological and religious studies.

HDS offers instruction in several languages, including Pali, a written language of early Buddhism. Students are expected to address their language requirements as early in their programs as possible.

There are four ways MTS students may demonstrate intermediate-level reading competency to satisfy the language requirement with one of the seven languages examined by HDS:.

By completing with a grade of B or better the second semester of an HDS intermediate-level course in Greek, Hebrew, Pali, or Arabic (e.g., 4021 Intermediate Classical Hebrew II, 4221 Intermediate Greek II, 4055 Intermediate Pali II, or 4361 Intermediate Arabic II) or one semester of an HDS advanced intermediate-level course in Latin (e.g., Readings in Christian Latin: Hildegard of Bingen and the Gospels).

By receiving a grade of A or higher on the final exam in a modern language course in the School Summer Language Program.

For languages taught at Harvard University other than those offered and examined by the Divinity School, the same principles will apply for satisfying the language requirement. Students must achieve intermediate competency, which is usually measured as finishing with a B or better the fourth semester of a language course that follows the four-semester model.

Master of Religion and Public Life (MRPL) Program.

˅ More Details

Master of Theological Studies Program - Harvard Divinity School

  • GRE Required:  Yes
  • Research Assistantships:  864
  • Teaching Assistantships:  1388
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
University of Notre Dame logo
Ranked as:  #18 in Best National University
Tuition:  $57,522 per year
Total Cost:  $115,044 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Indiana
Acceptance:  18.99%

Graduate Program in Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and Theology.

The Ph.D. program in Peace Studies prepares students in research methodologies associated with the disciplines of anthropology, history, political science, psychology, sociology and theology. Graduates are credentialed in one of the six disciplines and fully acquainted with the research questions and findings of interdisciplinary peace research. The program has a strong placement record, and graduates hold important academic, governmental, and non-profit positions around the world.

Official transcripts from each post-secondary institution one must show conferral of a bachelor degree. (Due upon enrollment).

Writing sample(s) refer to program site for details.

˅ More Details

Peace Studies and Theology - The Graduate School

  • GRE Required:  Yes
  • Research Assistantships:  793
  • Teaching Assistantships:  676
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
we can find best-fit college

326 universities offer the Master's program in Theology and Theological Studies.

Which one best suits your need?

Please select a program.
Select a program:
Please choose a course.
Please choose a specialization.
Please choose an option.
Have you taken the GRE?
GRE quantitative field is required. (Minimum: 80 | Maximum: 170)
GRE Verbal field is required. (Minimum: 80 | Maximum: 170)
GRE AWA field is required. (Minimum: 0 | Maximum: 6)
Please choose a type of university.
Type of University:
Education level completed:
Please choose a price interval.
$5000 $80000
Tuition sorting:
Please provide a First Name.
Please provide a Last Name.
Please provide a name.
Please provide your address.
Please, enter valid email address.
Please, enter valid phone.
Please, enter valid phone.
Georgetown University logo
Ranked as:  #22 in Best National University
Tuition:  $53,591 per year
Total Cost:  $107,182 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Washington D. C.
Acceptance:  16.81%

Georgetown offers a Ph.D. in Theological and Religious Studies, an interdisciplinary program that allows students to pursue the critical and comparative study of theology and religion.

Students admitted to our program receive five years of full funding, which includes tuition, health coverage, and a generous stipend. Our program also allocates funding for conference travel, and our current students regularly present at national and international conferences. Current students have also received grants and awards from outside fellowships for summer language study and dissertation research.

Our strengths as a department are augmented by a wealth of other resources at Georgetown, including the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding, the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, the Program for Jewish Civilization, the East Asian Languages and Cultures, and the Arab and Islamic Studies.

˅ More Details

Theology and Religious Studies

  • GRE Required:  Register to view the details
  • Research Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Teaching Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
Emory University logo
Ranked as:  #22 in Best National University
Tuition:  $44,676 per year
Total Cost:  $89,352 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Georgia
Acceptance:  19.17%

Dual Degree: Master of Arts in Bioethics (MA-Bioethics).

The MTS is especially designed for individuals interested in pursuing some aspect of teaching and research, whether in an academic context, the non-profit world, or in public policy and social engagement. It provides superb preparation for doctoral-level studies in religion and theology.

The program focuses on three areas: History, Scripture, Tradition of Christianity Modern Religious Thought and Experience and Global Religions. The MTS emphasizes historical and constructive issues of religious and theological reflection from a variety of perspectives. The larger Candler and Emory community provides a setting of open engagement and serious theological reflection that enhances the context of the MTS program.

The flexibility of the Candler MTS program allows students to focus their work within an area of specialization or construct a broader degree across the theological disciplines. The program is also intentional helping students discern their vocation through plenaries, small groups and professional development electives in areas such as Non-Profit Leadership and Management Religion, Violence and Peacebuilding and Youth Ministry.

Credit Hours The 48-credit hour curriculum is structured to be completed in two years of full-time study the maximum length of time allowed to complete the program is six years.

Curriculum All students, regardless of their area of focus, are required to complete six hours of courses designated as History, Scripture, Tradition of Christianity six hours of courses designated as Modern Religious Thought and Experience, and six hours of courses in Global Religions.

Thesis and Portfolio Students will complete the degree with course work plus a thesis or a portfolio. Theses or portfolios should be written within the declared area of focus.

That means that students can design a program to fit their academic interests. Up to two-thirds of the curriculum is customizable.

Prerequisites for advanced courses taken at Candler usually do not apply to MTS students.

In keeping with the flexibility of the program, no maximum limit is placed on the number of courses taken in an area of focus. At the same time, a candidate should pursue a cluster of courses that reasonably constitutes interests outside of the area of focus in order to balance depth with breadth in a course of study.

Candler offers the following certificates in conjunction with a Candler degree.

Black Church Studies A theoretical and practical exploration of the black church tradition and its role in contemporary society.

Human Rights (Emory Graduate Certificate)Combines the resources of Emory University with the applied programs of our professional partners, including CARE USA, The Carter Center, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among others, for an interdisciplinary approach to human rights scholarship and training.

Candler offers four dual degrees with the Master of Theological Studies.

˅ More Details

Master of Theological Studies - Candler School of Theology

  • GRE Required:  Register to view the details
  • Research Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Teaching Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
Boston University logo
Ranked as:  #41 in Best National University
Tuition:  $57,666 per year
Total Cost:  $115,332 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Massachusetts
Acceptance:  20.09%

Applicants must have graduated with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 from an accredited college and have a broad liberal arts background with a general knowledge of theological subjects. Students who have already completed a previous Master of Divinity degree are not eligible for admission to the MTS and should seek the STM instead.

Focused knowledge in a specific discipline for students pursuing a particular MTS concentration or, in other cases, a survey knowledge of various theological disciplines.

The curriculum begins with two semesters of basic study of scripture and the yearlong interdisciplinary exploration of history, theology, and contexts contained in the TF 701 Introduction to Christian Traditions TF 702 Christianity Engaging Modernity sequence of courses. Reflecting on the contexts, theologies, scriptures, and historical experiences of communities of faith establishes basic frameworks for the deeper explorations that will lie ahead. And because all such exploration must take place in dialogue with the contemporary challenges of leadership, at some point during the course of study, all students engage in one semester of contextual education appropriate to their educational goals.

The successful completion of 49 credit hours is required for the MTS degree. This program is designed to be completed in two academic years of full-time work (four semesters). The time limit for the degree program is four years (eight semesters).

All awards are for a maximum of two academic years of full-time MTS study. If the student has been awarded a stipend in addition to their full tuition, the stipend will be split equally over the two semesters and be paid to the student by check in the first month of each semester.

Tuition Scholarships: Tuition Scholarships are awarded for the academic year, September to May. All awards are for a maximum of two academic years of full-time MTS study.

All MTS core requirements must be taken at the Boston University School of Theology.

Students who do not earn a passing grade in TF 701 Introduction to Christian Traditions may continue on to their second semester of coursework however, students will be expected to retake the semester that they did not pass. All core requirements must be passed for graduation.

Courses offered in the School of Theology (and certain courses available through the Boston Theological Institute [BTI] and elsewhere in the University) are organized into three curriculum clusters:.

The current list of courses available in each cluster is found in the STH Bulletin, and the STH Registrar maintains a list of alterations to that list between publications of the Bulletin. Students in the Master of Theological Studies program are required to complete:.

No core courses may be taken outside STH.

Grade Minimums No grade lower than C is acceptable for use in core course requirements for the Master of Theological Studies degree. will be accepted for cluster electives or specialization coursework.

Final Degree Assessment All candidates for the Master of Theological Studies degree will undertake a final degree assessment in the period between midterm examinations and the penultimate week of coursework in the final semester of registration.

MA and PhD Programs from Arts Sciences.

Note that this information may change at any time. Read the full terms of use.

˅ More Details

University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science

  • GRE Required:  Register to view the details
  • Research Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Teaching Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
Marquette University logo
Ranked as:  #83 in Best National University
Tuition:  $21,690 per year
Total Cost:  $43,380 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Wisconsin
Acceptance:  82.49%

Explore over 70 certificate, master and doctoral programs offered through the Graduate School at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Marquette is routinely listed among the country top universities, renowned for academic rigor, innovation and the achievements of its community of scholars.

The Theology offers a master program aimed at giving students an integrated approach to theological studies, emphasizing, within theological specialties, the interaction of Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, and in historical, systematic and ethical approaches to theology.

The Master in Theology program seeks to develop scholars who can make significant contributions to theological research and writing, and college and high school teachers who can teach a broad range of courses. This broad theological background has enabled program graduates to enjoy enviable success in securing teaching positions at than 200 colleges and universities, in church work and ministry, and in a variety of other education-related institutions.

Students considering careers in education may choose from three pre-academic specializations:.

Students with other vocational aspirations may prefer one of the following specializations:.

Students participating in the Trinity Fellows program may choose our interdisciplinary specialization in Theology and Society.

The Graduate School is excited to offer all students in humanities graduate programs a $500 per credit hour rate. Take advantage of this nearly 60-percent tuition reduction in the following master of arts programs: English, History, Theology and Philosophy.

Students typically begin their studies in the fall of each academic year.

Rolling admission, which means you may apply any time before the following dates:.

A brief statement of purpose that includes: reasons for wanting to enter the program, vocational objectives, special areas of interest, and reasons for selecting Marquette program.

The Theology draws on the university considerable financial aid resources to offer a variety of assistance opportunities to qualified students. These resources include teaching assistantships (TA), research assistantships (RA), minority student fellowships, graduate teaching fellowships, dissertation fellowships, M.A.C.D. scholarship, Smith Family fellowships, Arthur J. Schmitt fellowships, John P. Raynor, S.J., fellowships and Marquette University scholarships.

Private scholarshipsmay also be available. U.S. citizens and permanent residents may be eligible to apply forstudent loansto help fund their educational expenses as well.

Students interested in the theology master program may want to consider applying for theTrinity Fellows program as well. Trinity Fellows is a graduate fellowship program dedicated to developing urban leaders with a commitment to social and economic justice. Trinity Fellows participate in a 21-month study work program while earning a master degree.

Online Options available in our Christian Doctrine specialization.

2022-23 Tuition Cost Per Credit for Master Program: $500.00.

˅ More Details

MA in Theology Graduate School Marquette University

  • GRE Required:  Register to view the details
  • Research Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Teaching Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
University of San Diego logo
Ranked as:  #97 in Best National University
Tuition:  $28,410 per year
Total Cost:  $56,820 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  California
Acceptance:  58.7%

The Master of Theological Studies (MTS) is a two-year academic program suitable for those interested in pursuing careers in teaching or ministry or as preparation for further academic work. The MTS thesis demonstrates the student’s ability to develop a coherent, sustained theological argument reflecting an in-depth study of the theological topic.

The Master of Theological Studies (MTS) is a two-year academic program that provides a breadth of theological understanding for those interested in pursuing a career in teaching at the elementary, secondary, or junior college level in church ministry as preparation for further academic work.

Students choose an area of academic specialization among Biblical Studies (Old or New Testament), Christian Spirituality, Cultural and Historical Studies of Religion, Ethics and Social Theory Religion and Society, History, Liturgical Studies, and Systematic and Philosophical Theology.

Complete 48 semester units as described in the curriculum below, a maximum of 13 of which may be taken at the University of San Diego’s graduate schools.

˅ More Details

Master of Theological Studies Master of Theology - Franciscan School of Theology

  • GRE Required:  Register to view the details
  • Research Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Teaching Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
Saint Louis University logo
Ranked as:  #105 in Best National University
Tuition:  $22,074 per year
Total Cost:  $44,148 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Missouri
Acceptance:  55.54%

The Master of Theological Studies (M.T.S.) program in Saint Louis University Theological Studies is geared toward students who want to pursue focused scholarship, prepare for future doctoral work or simply exercise their intellectual curiosity.

SLU M.T.S. program offers an ideal first degree in theology, orienting students to the major fields of theological study, including biblical studies, the history of Christianity, theological ethics and constructive theology.

Resources for theology students at SLU include the than 37,000 microfilms of the Vatican Film Library, the archives of the Institute of Jesuit Sources and than 150,0000 volumes of the Divinity Library in the Pius XII Memorial Library (which contains 1.4 million books, journals and other media). The library also provides access to many key research resources, including the Patrologia Latina, Brepolis, Early English Books OnLine, ATLA, Catholic Periodical Index, J-STOR, Index of Christian Art, as well as electronic access to major journals and other indexing tools.

Saint Louis University Center for Digital Humanities creates products and tools to support teaching and research in historical theology.

Graduates of SLU theology program have gone on to a wide range of careers in academia, educational administration, museums, libraries, archives and nonprofit agencies. SLU Theological Studies is committed to the professional preparation of every graduate student.

Applicants with a strong background (at least 18 credits of upper-level coursework) in theology or religious studies will also be considered.

Academic records, in English translation, of students who have undertaken postsecondary studies outside the United States must include:.

The grades earned or the results of all end-of-term examinations.

For priority consideration for a graduate assistantship, apply by the program admission deadlines listed. Fellowships and assistantships provide a stipend and may include health insurance and a tuition scholarship for the duration of the award.

Graduates will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the broad outlines of Christian scripture, Christian history, and the major theological developments in the tradition, as well as core terms, categories, and exempla that frame theological and religious studies.

Graduates will be able to articulate and apply the theories and methods that structure the study of theology and religion.

Graduates will be able to communicate effectively, both in writing and orally, demonstrating clear, coherent, and well-developed complexity of thought and analysis.

Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 in all graduate professional courses.

Roadmaps are recommended semester-by-semester plans of study for programs and assume full-time enrollment unless otherwise noted.

Courses and milestones designated as critical (marked with !) must be completed in the semester listed to ensure a timely graduation. Transfer credit may change the roadmap.

This roadmap should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. Requirements, course availability and sequencing are subject to change.

˅ More Details

Theological Studies M.T.S.

  • GRE Required:  Register to view the details
  • Research Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Teaching Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details
Miami University-Oxford logo
Ranked as:  #105 in Best National University
Tuition:  $31,697 per year
Total Cost:  $63,394 * This tuition data is based on IPEDS. For the latest tuition amount, refer to the respective college websites.
State:  Ohio
Acceptance:  91.95%

Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.)Master of Arts in Christian Doctrine (M.A.C.D.).

The Theology offers graduate programs aimed at providing students an integrated approach to theology emphasizing the scriptural, historical, systematic, and ethical approaches to study in the Catholic and Christian religious traditions. We aim to develop scholars capable of making significant contributions to theological research and teaching a broad range of subjects in theology and religion. Our programs have prepared graduates to secure teaching positions in over 200 colleges, universities, and other educational institutions as well as for vocations in pastoral ministry and other service-oriented and non-profit organizations.

The Master of Arts in Christian Doctrine (M.A.C.D.) program focuses on ecumenical appropriation and communication of Christian doctrine for students teaching or aspiring to teach in Catholic high schools, those interested in contributing to other avenues of religious education or formation, those interested in serving other pastoral needs in their religious communities, and those seeking personal theological enrichment.

Doctor of Philosophy in Religious Studies (Ph.D.) applicants should possess a master degree or equivalent graduate degree in theology, religious studies, or another field appropriate to their academic interests.

Applicants to all of the department graduate programs must submit their applications to the Graduate School using its online application management system.

Results of the Graduate Record Examination (General Test only).

Applicants with language study experience should indicate formal graduate-level language course work reflected in their transcripts and or private language study, along with estimations of present abilities reading, writing, and speaking the language or languages studied.

Upon admission, final official transcripts from all previously attended higher education institutions, with certified English translations if their original language is not English, must be submitted to the Graduate School. Failure to submit those transcripts within the first five weeks of the student term of enrollment may result in a registration hold barring the student from registering for future academic terms.

Students must complete 30 credit hours of course work, pass a comprehensive examination and submit an approved final project. Students choosing the Judaism and Christianity in antiquity, historical theology, and systematic theology theological ethics specializations must demonstrate proficiency in a modern language other than English. The following program description summarizes those requirements. Additional information may be found in the Theology Policies and Procedures.

For the following three specializations, students may pursue either of two academic plans: Plan A or Plan B. Students are assumed to opt for Plan B unless expressly approved by the department Graduate Committee to pursue Plan A instead.

Students choosing the theology and society specialization must be affiliated with the Trinity Fellows program and must opt for academic Plan B. Up to 6 credit hours of non-theology course work completed in conjunction with the Trinity Fellows program may be applied to the student elective course work requirement.

Master of Arts in Christian Doctrine (M.A.C.D.) Requirements.

Students must complete 30 credit hours of course work and produce a comprehensive paper. The following program description summarizes those requirements. Additional information may be found in the Theology Policies and Procedures.

The following program description summarizes those requirements. Additional information may be found in the Theology Policies and Procedures.

Students choosing the theology and society specialization must complete at least 30 credit hours of course work in one of the Theology principal areas of specialization, at least 9 credit hours of course work in each of the department other two principal areas of specialization, and 12 credit hours of graduate course work in one or disciplines pertaining to their specific research agenda (e.g., economics, education, history, philosophy, political science or psychology).

Students choosing the health care mission and ethics option must complete at least 30 credit hours of course work in one of the Theology principal areas of specialization, at least 9 credit hours in each of the department other two principal areas of specialization, and 12 credit hours of graduate course work pertaining to healthcare. (e.g., NURS 6007 Ethics, Policy and Health Care Advocacy, NURS 6009 Organizational and Systems Leadership, HEAL 6841 Health Care Finance, HEAL 6846 Health Care Informatics, HEAL 6848 Health Care Policy, LAW 7156 Current Issues in Health Law, LAW 7181 Elder Law, LAW 7221 Health Law).

Students choosing the interdisciplinary specialization may be required to take additional course work beyond the program 60-credit-hour minimum to certify their qualifications in both theology and the allied disciplines of their choosing.

Once students has fulfill all of the language requirements and no earlier than their final term completing course work, they are eligible to take the doctoral qualifying examination. The examination has two stages, namely the written examination and the oral examination. The written examination is in four parts, each three hours in duration, and is administered in two sessions, typically on consecutive days. Students complete two of the examination parts during each session. The oral examination is administered following the administration of the written examination in a single session lasting approximately 90 minutes.

Each committee member examines the students on a topic or topics corresponding with their area of academic expertise. Students must earn the satisfactory evaluation of each of the five committee members to pass the examination. Students advances to doctoral candidacy once they pass the doctoral qualifying examination, completes their course work requirements, and fulfills all of their language requirements.

Upon advancing to doctoral candidacy, students must complete 12 credit hours of dissertation research. All dissertation credit hours must be completed before students schedule their dissertation defense.

Following the successful defense of the dissertation, students may be given a fixed amount of time to revise their work in light of the board feedback. Students submit the final edition of the dissertation to the Graduate School in advance of their graduation.

Introduction to the history, literature, and religion of ancient Israel. History and methods of interpretation. Prere THEO-MA or THEO-MACD student or cons.

Background, geography, text, language, versions, editions. Principal problems in individual books. Exegetical techniques. Hermeneutical principles. Prere THEO-MA or THEO-MACD student or cons.

Formation, structure, and styles of the four canonical Gospels. Topics to be studied include: their sources, literary relationships, depictions of Jesus, role of the Church, discipleship, and suffering. Each Gospel will be studied in terms of the communities that produced them and their relationship to other texts. Exegesis of selected texts. Prere THEO-MA or THEO-MACD student.

A brief introduction to historiography and historical method with a focused introduction to major theological issues and debates (e.g., scripture and tradition trinity Christology grace and sacraments faith and reason church and state) and to some of the key contributions of major eastern and western theologians (e.g., Origen, Augustine, Pseudo-Dionysius, John of Damascus, Anselm, Abelard, Gregory Palamas, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Scotus). Prere THEO-MA or THEO-MACD stduent or cons. ch. required for all master candidates.

A basic introduction to theological developments from 1350 to the end of the Enlightenment (1800). Examines major theological movements and the thought of major thinkers (e.g., Ockham, Biel, Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Bellarmine, Bossuet, Pascal, Spener, Edwards, Lessing, Kant) within their social, historical, and philosophical contexts. Prere THEO-MA or THEO-MACD student or cons. ch. required for all master candidates.

Relation of systematic theology to faith, revelation (the Bible, Church creeds and doctrines), and the Church. The role of biblical exegesis, historical scholarship, philosophy, natural and human sciences in systematic theology. Derivation of various categories, subdivisions, and methods of systematic theology. The challenges and prospects of interconfessional and interreligious dialogue for systematic theology. Prere THEO-MA student or cons.

Explores the theological foundations of and key concepts, texts and figures in the field of Christian spirituality. Focuses on the relationship between theory and practice in historical and contemporary contexts. Prere THEO-MA or THEO-MACD student or cons.

Systematic survey of the fundamental categories, concepts and norms used in moral theology to analyze human moral experience. The role of Scripture and tradition as foundational sources in moral theology. The church as the locus for Christian moral reflection. Pivotal issues in the historical development of moral theology. The relation of moral philosophy to moral theology. Required for master core curriculum. Prere THEO-MA or THEO-MACD student or cons.

Explores the following principles of Catholic Social teaching: the dignity of persons in community and the common good the duties of the state and the principle of subsidiarity kinds of justice and their application in social, political and economic life the relationship between labor and capital Church-state relationships war and peace and environmental stewardship. The issues are traced through the documents of Vatican II and selected Apostolic Exhortations. Prere THEO-MA or THEO-MACD student or cons.

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew. Emphasis will be placed on grammar, verb syntax, and vocabulary acquisition. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Reading of selected narrative and poetic books. Advanced grammar. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Includes biblical Aramaic and Qumran Aramaic. Emphasis on providing the student with the tools to use these dialects in other biblical courses. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Detailed study of the first five books of the Old Testament. Exegesis of selected passages. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Key themes in the prophetic movement. Relation of the prophets to the cult, society, and history of ancient Israel. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

A study of the literary, theological, and historical dimensions of the book of Psalms. Relationship between the psalms and cultic life. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. The structure, sources, narrative technique, and theology of the Deuteronomistic corpus. Hebrew text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Study of the place of Wisdom Literature in the development of Hebrew thought. Exegesis of selected passages. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Study of the books of the Old Testament Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha. Other developments of the period. Exegesis of selected passages. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Jewish history, institutions, movements, and writings of this period, including Qumran, as they pertain to biblical studies. Jewish interpretation of scripture midrash haggadah and halakah targums Hellenistic influences on Judaism in Palestine and the diaspora other related topics. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

An investigation into some of the other books of the Hebrew Bible beyond Torah and Prophets. May include literary, theological, and historical elements of The Five Scrolls, Daniel, Ezra-Nehemiah, I and II Chronicles. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Specialized research on topics or problems within and or related to the Old Testament writings. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

An introduction to the Greek of the Hellenistic era, including the New Testament. Emphasis on grammar, syntax, vocabulary acquisition and historical context and theology. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Advanced grammar readings in texts from 300 B.C. to 300 A.D. Emphasis on the language of the New Testament as reflective of continuity and change in Greek vocabulary, morphology, syntax, style, and the historical context and theology of these texts. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Study of traditional religion, mystery cults, philosophical schools, astrology and magic, literary genres and tendencies, and other related topics. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Origin and development of prophetic and apocalyptic eschatology. The social and religious phenomenon of apocalypticism. The genre apocalypse in Jewish and early Christian tradition. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Literary interrelationship of the four Gospels. Theories of Gospel priority and dependence. Development of oral and written traditions. Distinctive character of the Gospel form. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Formation, structure, and style of the Gospel of Matthew. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Formation, structure, and style of the Gospel of Mark. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Formation, structure, and style of Luke-Acts. Questions of Christian origins. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Formation, structure, and style of the Gospel of John. Source, redaction, and literary analysis to reconstruct the stages of formation and their corresponding theologies. Relation of the Johannine letters to the Gospel. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Background and purpose of this letter. Examination of important Pauline themes, issues, and methods of argumentation. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Study of I and or II Corinthians in the context of Paul pastoral relationship to Corinth. Integrity, background and purpose of the letters. Examination of important themes, issues, and methods of argumentation. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Study of one or of the following letters: Galatians, Philippians, I and II Thessalonians, and Philemon. Background and purpose of these writings. Examination of important Pauline themes, issues, and methods of argumentation. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Authorship, milieu, and purpose of these letters. Their relationship to one another and to other Pauline traditions. Review of critical issues and examination of theological themes and methods of argumentation. Exegesis of selected passages. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Study of one or of the following New Testament texts: I and II Timothy Titus Hebrews James I and II Peter I, II, and III John Jude and Revelation 1-3. Background, purpose, and theology of these writings. Exegesis of key passages. Relationship of these works to selected non-canonical writings. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Specialized research on topics or problems within and or related to the New Testament writings. Greek text used. Prere REST-PhD student or THEO 6120 and cons.

The interpretation of the history of the Church and of doctrine as seen by ecclesiastical historians from Eusebius to Harnack their characteristic approaches and concerns. Recent trends in historiography and historical theology. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

A study of the development of Christian beliefs and doctrines in the patristic age. The following themes are treated: the authority of Scripture and tradition Father, Word, Spirit, and the divine Triad the person of Jesus the Christ sin, redemption and grace the Church and the sacraments. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Survey of Greek theology from Nicea (325 A.D.) to the fall of Constantinople (1453). Particular attention to the most important writers following the Council of Chalcedon, beginning with Dionysius Areopagita and concluding with Gregory Palamas and Nicholas Cabasilas. Focus on the abiding Greek preoccupation with salvation as deification and its contribution to the continuity of Eastern Christian thought. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

A study of the development of Christian theology from Augustine to Thomas Aquinas. Includes the following themes: the character and method of theology after Augustine monastic theology the early Eucharistic controversies reason, logic, and the origins of Scholasticism 12th century humanism and theology Scholasticism and Thomism. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Theological pluralism of the 13th-15th centuries. Thomism and nominalism, mysticism and humanism, conciliarism, Augustinianism. Reform, questions of authority, faith, catholicity. Sixteenth century responses. Luther to Calvin, Muenster to Menno Simons, early Roman Catholic polemical theology to Trent. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

A study of major developments in Christian life and thought in the 17th-19th centuries in Europe, with a focus on intellectual history. Jansenism and Cartesianism the impact of Enlightenment thought. The Romantic revivals of theology in Schleiermacher and the Tubingen Schools. German Idealism and its debacle. Biblical criticism. Varieties of 19th century options in theology. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

An analysis of developments in American theology from Puritanism to the present. Examines representative theologians of Puritanism, revivalism, enlightenment, progressive orthodoxy, social gospel, modernism, Americanism, and neo-orthodoxy within the context of American political and social movements. Themes considered: the church, grace, religious liberty, church and state, voluntaryism, person of Jesus, tradition, adaptation. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

A study of the Christian writings of the 2nd century, especially Clement of Rome, Ignatius of Antioch, the Epistle of Barnabas, the Didache, the Greek apologists, and Irenaeus, with particular attention to their relation to the Old and New Testaments, the doctrine of the Logos, Church order, and the emerging understanding of orthodoxy and heresy. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Against the background of Clement attempt to incorporate Greek modes of thought into Christianity, an extensive study of Origen as a biblical commentator and the first systematic theologian, with some consideration of the neoplatonic tradition in Christianity, Origen influence on later theology, and the Origenist controversies. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Reading and study of some of the writings of Athanasius, Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa and others, with attention given to the Trinitarian controversies of the 4th century, the councils of Nicea and Constantinople, and the rise and fall of Arianism. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

The Septuagint as the first Christian Bible authority for religious truth in the Apostolic Fathers and the Apologists evidence for the liturgical use of Christian writings the apocryphal New Testament the canon of four gospels the collection of the Apostles' letters lists of canonical books the beginnings of exegesis modern theological speculation on the canon. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

An intensive study of Augustine life, writings and thought. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Proposes a reading of the classical canon of early monastic literature. Beginning with a few sessions devoted to sources, the course moves to the early Syrians, notably Aphrahat of Persia and Ephrem Syrus, and then to the better-known and enormously influential Vita Antonii, the several Vitae of Pachomius, the History of the Monks of Egypt, Basil the Great Longer and Shorter Rules, Gregory of Nyssa, Evagrius of Pontus, the Macarian Homilies, such early 5th century works as Palladius of Hieropolis' Lausiac History, John Casian Institutes and Conferences, Theodoret of Cyrrhus' Historia religosa, and the Sayings of the Desert Fathers. Concludes with an examination of Benedict of Nursia Life (by Gregory the Great) and Rule. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Survey of theology in monasteries and cathedral schools, from the Gregorian Reform to Alan of Lille, including e.g., Anselm of Canterbury, Peter Abelard, Bernard of Clairvaux, the Victorines, Peter Lombard. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

The critical reading of the texts of Aquinas in developmental sequence with emphasis on the character of the Summa theologiae. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Readings and study of both the academic and the mystical writings of Bonaventure, with special emphasis on the Breviloquium. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Revival of Augustinian thought. Wyclif, Hus to Bradwardine. Via Gregorii. Commentaries on St. Augustine. Anti-Pelagianism and Donatism. Mediation of Augustinian thought to subsequent periods. Prere REST-PhD student or cons.

Hermeneutical developments from the Victorines. Sources and methods for interpreting historical exegesis. Humanist work on Scripture. The place of the Bible in theology. Luther as doctor of Scripture. Trent and Bible study.

˅ More Details

Theology Religious Studies

  • GRE Required:  Register to view the details
  • Research Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Teaching Assistantships:  Register to view the details
  • Financial Aid: Register to view the details

Find scholarships and financial aid for Theology and Theological Studies graduate programs

$500 $20000

What is the GRE score required for admission to Master's degree in Theology and Theological Studies?

Gre score requirements differ from school to school. Most colleges do not publish the cutoff scores. For example 326 universities offer Master's programs in Theology and Theological Studies.

Gre score requirements for Master's program in Theology and Theological Studies

Are there colleges for the Theology and Theological Studies Masters program that do not require GRE/GMAT?

Quite a few accredited universities have waived off the GRE score requirements for admissions to Masters programs. 326 offer Graduate programs in Theology and Theological Studies. Below are listed 4 universities that do not require GRE/GMAT for admission to Master's program. For viewing the all the schools that have waived off GRE/GMAT for the admission, use Match Me Masters.

No GRE schools for Masters in Theology and Theological Studies

Which are the accredited universities that offer phd/doctoral programs offered in Theology and Theological Studies?

10 universities offer graduate PHD program in Theology and Theological Studies

Best Theology and Theological Studies graduate PHD programs

Are there any one year masters programs in Theology and Theological Studies?

6 Universities offer On-campus Masters Program within an One Year - 18 months. The tuition for Master's can range from $9,445 to $50,340.

On-campus Masters 1 year - 18 months in Theology and Theological Studies

How much does it cost to get a Master's in Theology and Theological Studies and how to find the most affordable Masters program?

Master's degree in Theology and Theological Studies is offered by 325 US universities. The tuition for the Master's degree can range from $8,349 per year at Liberty University to $50,654 at Harvard University.

The tuition at public universities will be lower for in-state students when compared to private universities but you get more financial aid at private universities.

Most affordable Master's program in Theology and Theological Studies

Is it worth getting a master's degree in Theology and Theological Studies?

Before you invest 2-3 years of your life and anywhere between $40,000 - $110,00 of your hard earned money, students do ask as to what is the return on investment on the Master's degree. Here are some of the statistics from bls.gov.

Are there universities offering online Master's in Theology and Theological Studies?

Online Master's degree in Theology and Theological Studies is offered by 14 US universities. The tuition for the Master's degree can range from $4,020 per year at Regent University to $83,980 at Concordia University-Irvine.

Online Master's in Theology and Theological Studies

Career Outlook

Overall employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations. About 139,600 openings for postsecondary teachers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

The median annual wage for postsecondary teachers was $80,560 in May 2020. Number of Jobs in 2020 was 1,276,900.

Career Opportunities with master's degree in Theology and Theological Studies


Job Title 2020 median Pay Number of Jobs Job Outlook What they do
Philosophy and Religion Teachers, Postsecondary $80,560 1,276,900 Overall employment of postsecondary teachers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2020 to 2030, faster than the average for all occupations. About 139,600 openings for postsecondary teachers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a variety of academic subjects beyond the high school level.
Music Directors and Composers $52,250 48,100 Employment of music directors and composers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations. About 6,000 openings for music directors and composers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire. Music directors lead musical groups during performances and recording sessions. Composers write and arrange original music in a variety of musical styles.

How can I compare the Theology and Theological Studies Graduate Programs?

Compare the GRE score requirements, admission details, credit requirements and tuition for the Master's Program, from 326 universities offering Graduate School Programs in Theology and Theological Studies. Compare Graduate School Programs in Theology and Theological Studies

How will you rate the search results?

 0.0 rating, based on 0 reviews

Your review has been sent

Select rating
Your review must be at least 10 characters long
Your review must be not longer than 2000 characters